Jan 24, 2011

Wisconsin Cheddar Cheese Soup

Jan23-2011-00

As a food blogger, you have to give credit where credit is due and not use someone’s recipe trying to pass it off as your own (Major pet peeve of mine. You see it happening a lot).

I happened upon this recipe for Wisconsin Cheddar Cheese Soup at Sargento and hope they don’t mind me borrowing it! I doubt I can buy their cheddar here in the Netherlands, much less get my hands on reduced sodium cheese, so I just used regular cheddar instead. I love the recipes they have listed there!

This soup combines beer and cheddar. Need I say more? I mean, c’mon, it had my guy drooling just from hearing the recipe directions! I had to make this.

I made a few changes, though:

1) I added corn. I love corn.

2) I added crispy bacon. I love bacon.

3) I added onion. It’s the right thing to do.

I served the soup with an enormous amount of crusty French bread and it was a wonderful lunch. The soup somewhat reminded me of cheese fondue. Delicious!

Ingredients:

1/4 cup all-purpose flour
2 oz butter (1/4 cup)
2 cups sharp cheddar (grated)
2 tsp Worcestershire sauce
1 small onion
1 cup corn
2 cups milk
1 cup beer
1 1/2 tsp mustard powder
1/4 tsp cayenne pepper
1 tsp salt
pepper

Optional: Bacon or garlic croutons



Directions:

The happy lot. Heineken! Like you expected anything else from a Dutch girl, right?
Wisconsin Cheddar Cheese Soup

Sargento used croutons, I opted for crispy bacon. Bacon rights all the wrongs in this world.
Wisconsin Cheddar Cheese Soup

Two more things I’ve added: half a can of leftover corn from the night before. And a finely minced small onion.
Wisconsin Cheddar Cheese Soup

Heat the butter and add the onion when the butter is still melting. Cook over low heat for about 5 minutes, but make sure not to let the onion brown.
Wisconsin Cheddar Cheese Soup

Add the mustard powder.
Wisconsin Cheddar Cheese Soup

And 1/4 cup all-purpose flour.
Wisconsin Cheddar Cheese Soup

Stir well and cook the roux for a minute.
Wisconsin Cheddar Cheese Soup

Pour in 2 cups of a milk and stir like a madman. I wanted a slightly thicker soup, if you don’t, add another 1/2 a cup of milk.
Wisconsin Cheddar Cheese Soup

This photo will be enough to make grown men cry! Pour 1 cup of the beer into the soup. You can replace the beer with dry white wine, water or even chicken broth.
Wisconsin Cheddar Cheese Soup

Season with the cayenne pepper—this will give a hint of color—Worcestershire sauce, salt and pepper. Stir in the corn and let the soup simmer for 5 minutes.
Wisconsin Cheddar Cheese Soup

Add the cheese. You might as well stick it on your thighs straight away, but oh boy, this is the good stuff! I simply adore cheese soup.
Wisconsin Cheddar Cheese Soup

Stir well and let the cheese melt. Give the soup another 5 minutes over low to medium heat.
Wisconsin Cheddar Cheese Soup

Check the seasoning. Ladle the soup into pretty bowls and top each bowl with crumbled up bacon and some chopped up parsley.

Want to make the men in your life happy and convert even those that don’t care for soup? Make this soup, stat! It’s fast, simple, and tastes like a million bucks.
Wisconsin Cheddar Cheese Soup

Wisconsin Cheddar Cheese Soup
Ingredients
    1/4 cup all-purpose flour
    2 oz butter (1/4 cup)
    2 cups sharp cheddar (grated)
    2 tsp Worcestershire sauce
    1 small onion
    1 cup corn
    2 cups milk
    1 cup beer
    1 1/2 tsp mustard powder
    1/4 tsp cayenne pepper
    1 tsp salt
    pepper

    Optional:> bacon or garlic croutons
Directions
    Heat the butter and add the onion when the butter is still melting. Cook over low heat for about 5 minutes, but make sure not to let the onion brown.

    Add the mustard powder and flour. Stir well and cook the roux for a minute before pouring in the milk and beer. Season with cayenne pepper, salt, Worcestershire sauce and some pepper. Add the corn and simmer the soup for 5 minutes.

    Add the cheddar, stir well while the cheese melts. Give the soup another 5 minutes over low to medium heat. Check the seasoning. Ladle the soup into pretty bowls and top each bowl with crumbled up bacon and some chopped up parsley.
Meal type: lunch
Servings: 4
Copyright: © kayotickitchen.com

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    32 Comments »

    1. 1

      YUM!  That looks wonderful.  Hope your little man is all better!

      Deborah Patrick on Jan 24, 2011 @ 8:09 am Reply
    2. 2

      @Deborah Patrick:

      He’s doing a lot better! Still a somewhat persistent cough, though.

      Kay on Jan 24, 2011 @ 8:11 am Reply
    3. 3

      The soup looks absolutely delicious!

      Maria on Jan 24, 2011 @ 8:35 am Reply
    4. 4

      Kay;  As far as I know, as long as you give credit to the best of your knowledge, you can feature someone else’s recipe. If you know the author of it is a bit pissy on the subject, it is best to get their written permission. I hear that the originators of Kentucky Derby Pie will sue the  pants off anyone who uses that name for the recipe. And so, Chocolate Bourbon Pecan Pie will suffice. Michelen alumni David Lebovitz had never heard such a thing before, and he has a blog. The bloggers have been tagged as being bitchy about it, but the ones who roll their eyeballs at the bloggers for protecting their intellectual property, need to understand that much work goes into developing an original recipe and they are no less a creative entity as are musicians, or writers, or artists, all of whom are protected by copyright laws.

      Linda at Pink Elephants Coffee,LLC on Jan 24, 2011 @ 11:20 am Reply
    5. 5

      @Linda at Pink Elephants Coffee,LLC:

      What you see a lot in food blogging land (even bigger food bloggers actually do this) is that some people will take a recipe from a place like allrecipes.com or so, post it and pass it off as their own without giving credit or even mentioning the original recipe/website they took it off.

      You can’t copyright a recipe because a recipe is simply a list of ingredients. People who want to use my recipes really don’t need my permission, but it’s really bad manners to use someone’s recipe and not give credit.

       

      Kay on Jan 24, 2011 @ 11:52 am Reply
    6. 6

      Mmmm yummy soup! I love cheddar cheese, and have heard of this soup. I’m excited!!

      Katrina on Jan 24, 2011 @ 1:46 pm Reply
    7. 7

      I love that you posted this the day after Wisconsin’s (American football) Packers won the NFC championship and are advancing to the Super Bowl. As my Dutch hubby likes to say, they are the “other cheese heads.” Looks like we’ll be making this for the Super Bowl party.

      Jen on Jan 24, 2011 @ 1:58 pm Reply
    8. 8

      This soup is a definite winner! Brilliant addition of the corn and bacon. Just brilliant! BeeBop’s gonna absolutely love this soup.

      Lana @ Never Enough Thyme on Jan 24, 2011 @ 2:13 pm Reply
    9. 9

      Yummi Kay it looks beautiful.
      I read an article about Can a recipe be stolen? Interesting. The only thing that can not be taken from your blog are your beautiful pictures….. Heck I don’t even have a copyright on my page lol. But give credit is always nice :)

      arrisje on Jan 24, 2011 @ 2:16 pm Reply
    10. 10

      @arrisje:

      What you can freely use is the ingredients, but the recipe as written here is copyrighted text. So you’d have to write the directions yourself.

      Even then it’s considered bad manners to blatantly use someone else’s recipe/work and pass it off as something you came up with yourself.

      The fun part though is when you make unique recipes, people are more likely to let you know that someone is using your recipe :)

       

       

      Kay on Jan 24, 2011 @ 2:40 pm Reply
    11. 11

      Kay;  Thank you so very much for your input. It’s one area that I was un- sure of and it is important to me at this particular time. I always give credit, be it a recipe or other things, and I don’t want to step on any toes or be rude. (I’ll e-mail you later to share why this is important to me at this time.)

      Linda at Pink Elephants Coffee,LLC on Jan 24, 2011 @ 5:15 pm Reply
    12. 12

      I am now officially craving cheese soup.

      Karly on Jan 24, 2011 @ 5:30 pm Reply
    13. 13

      Mmmm, Kay, this looks so good! And I agree about the importance of giving credit to the recipe source–amen! =)
      By the way, I just installed Yummy Soup and it’s a great program. Thanks so much for doing that giveaway.

      Jenna on Jan 24, 2011 @ 5:54 pm Reply
    14. 14

      This looks like I could finish the entire pot of soup on my own. In one sitting.

      Ilse on Jan 24, 2011 @ 8:13 pm Reply
    15. 15

      My guys would LOVE this soup!!

      Kath on Jan 25, 2011 @ 12:46 am Reply
    16. 16

      I make this soup almost with the exact ingredients you used and I’ve had this recipe for 30 years.   I never measure but I’m betting if I posted this recipe someone would swear it stole it from you.  My point is, recipes have been around a long time and even when we think we’ve made something no one else has ever made……they probably have.   I do understand giving credit where credit is due but I got my recipe (named Beer Cheese Soup) from a friend who got it from a friend………..and you know the rest.

      Janie on Jan 25, 2011 @ 4:26 am Reply
    17. 17

      @Janie:

      I agree, there an awful lot of generic recipes out there, like Shepherd’s pie or boeuf bourguignon that are all derived from each other. Those are usually not the recipes posted to food blogs because you can read them in every cook book. Food bloggers mainly create and develop their own recipes. That is a process that takes time. You cook and tweak a recipe several times before the recipe is ‘perfect’.

      An example were my http://www.kayotic.nl/blog/honey-glazed-chicken-bacon-bites

      I knew for a fact that when I made that recipe, I was the only one (online) with that recipe. It was unique. Yet within a week or so I received an email that someone blogged the exact same recipe, put it on Tasty Kitchen, and the emails started dropping in. When you create recipes yourself people automatically link them to you and recognize them. They become as much of an identity as a photography style.

      It makes a blogger look bad if they use someone’s recipe and not give credit. They’re not doing themselves any favors.

      Kay on Jan 25, 2011 @ 7:39 am Reply
    18. 18

      I completely understand what you’re saying and the frustrations.  There’s a whole lot of people trying to make a name for themselves off other people’s talents.  I have a shrimp etouffee’ recipe that I made up and then posted on my blog and I started seeing it on other blogs what I knew were readers of mine and it bothered me too!!

      Janie on Jan 25, 2011 @ 2:45 pm Reply
    19. 19

      @Janie:

      Luckily the food blogging world is pretty small, and sooner or later people will catch on. One thing I love though is when people take my basic recipes, tweak the heck out of it and make it their own.

      Kay on Jan 25, 2011 @ 4:48 pm Reply
    20. 20

      Oh, this looks utterly delicious and I’m sure my cheese-loving boyfriend (he’s Dutch) will adore this!

      Antonia MW on Jan 25, 2011 @ 5:19 pm Reply
    21. 21

      I do love cheese soup.  (Indiana is just a few miles from Wisconsin.)  We usually add random veggies to this soup, too: carrots, peas, onions, celery, corn, etc., and serve, as you say, with lots of crusty bread.
      So glad to hear that your son is feeling better!

      Deb in Indiana on Jan 26, 2011 @ 3:26 am Reply
    22. 22

      @Jen: Another Wisconsonite in NL? It will be a very late super bowl party!  Great recipe from my Home state Kay!

      Christy on Jan 27, 2011 @ 11:16 am Reply
    23. 23

      Oh yum, this looks so good

      madeline St onge on Jan 28, 2011 @ 1:50 am Reply
    24. 24

      there’s beer and bacon, i love this recipe already. great post!

      dillon on Jan 31, 2011 @ 7:10 am Reply
    25. 25

      Just tried your recipe for my mom and dad.  It’s a cold snowy day, and we ahd the soup for lunch with biscuits (scone-like bread) and baked apples.  It was great — good texture and good flavor.  I added a few extra veggies with the corn.  Thanks for the recipe.

      Deb in Indiana on Feb 13, 2011 @ 6:13 pm Reply

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