Jul 15, 2014

Pita Bread

Pita Bread

It’s been a bit quiet on the Dutch front, I know. The three of us came down with a monster-flu and, boy, it is a nasty one at that. Still haven’t kicked it.

I joined in on the foodblogswap fun (us Dutchies sure love to cook from each other’s blogs) and lo and behold; I got to cook from my girl Es’ Factory. Bingo! Of course I was aiming for that, you see… Esmée and I were separated at birth. Or at least we like to think so.

Now I knew she had a recipe for pita bread on her blog that I’d been wanting to try. I also knew it would be perfect with the Falafel, Red Onion Sauce and the Shoarma Seasoning that are already on my blog.

Pita bread is one of those things I always buy. I just toss it in the cart without even thinking about it. No idea why—especially after having tried this recipe. It’s so easy, they cook so fast and they taste a million times better.

Make your own pita, people. It’s the right thing to do. The Falafel deserves it, heck, the Falafel demands it.

All kidding aside; I was amazed by how simple and fast it is to make these at home. Letting the dough rise is pretty much the only labor that goes into it. What you end up with is a perfect pita with a great bread structure and incredible flavour.

Try them.. you won’t be sorry you did.

 

Ingredients:

3 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
2 tsp instant yeast
3 tbsp honey
4 tbsp olive oil
1 1/2 cup tepid water
1 tsp salt

 

Directions:

 
Es made 6 pita’s with these amounts, I think I’ll go with 8 pita’s next time. Just a tad smaller. I like being rebellious.
 

I used my mixer with dough hook for the job. Easy does it. Mix the flour with the yeast.
Pita Bread

 
I should have read the recipe more careful. Mea culpa. I was supposed to knead the oil into the dough afterwards, but it worked out well anyway.
 

So, in this recipe I add the honey and oil to the flour.
Pita Bread

Pour in the tepid water.
Pita Bread

Mix the dough for a bit.
Pita Bread

Add the salt and continue to mix until it becomes a supple dough.
Pita Bread

There we go. Lightly oil a big bowl.
Pita Bread

Put the dough into the oiled bowl and swirl it around, making sure all sides are covered with a thin layer of oil.
Pita Bread

Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and let the dough rise for 90 minutes, until doubled in size.
Pita Bread

 
You can work with the dough immediately now, or store it in the fridge for up to 3 days, but then you’ll have to punch it down once every 24 hours or so. Do make sure the dough is brought to room temperature before baking!

Crank up your oven. Mine was at 250Cº (485Fº). Place a baking sheet in the oven so it’ll get nice and hot.
 

Gently push down the dough and transfer it to a floured cutting board. Or counter top. You have options, you know!
Pita Bread

Turn the dough into 6 (or 8 to 9) even-sized pieces.
Pita Bread

Shape those pieces into firm balls.
Pita Bread

And roll ‘em out. Rollin’ rollin’ rollin’. Rawhide!
Pita Bread

This dough was fantastic to work with. Es said to turn the balls into 16cm (6.3”) discs.
Pita Bread

And when Es tells to you to turn them into 16cm discs, that’s what you do.
Pita Bread

 
She’s a rough cookie, you know. You don’t wanna mess with her. There’s no telling what will happen then.
 

Flip the dough over now and then and lightly flour both sides.
Pita Bread

These babies only need a few minutes. After, say, 3 to 4 minutes they’ll start to puff up. Technically that’s when they’re ready, yet still a bit pale. I gave them a minute or 2 extra to get a tan and bit of crunch, but that’s a personal preference.
Pita Bread

 
Man, I love that shot. No idea why.

 

See how easy it is and how pretty they are?
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I wish I could let you virtually taste them, you’d be sold instantly, like I was.
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Love ya, girly.

Pita Bread
Ingredients
    3 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
    2 tsp instant yeast
    3 tbsp honey
    4 tbsp olive oil
    1 1/2 cup tepid water
    1 tsp salt

Directions
    Mix the flour with the yeast. Add the honey, oil and water and mix the dough for a bit before addding the salt. Turn it into a supple dough and store it in a lightly oiled lareg bowl making sure all the dough is covered with a thin layer of oil.

    Let the dough rise for 90 minutes, until it has doubled in size. You can work with the dough immediately now, or store it in the fridge for up to 3 days, but then you’ll have to punch it down once every 24 hours or so. Do make sure the dough is brought to room temperature before baking!

    Crank up your oven. Mine was at 250Cº (485Fº). Place a baking sheet in there so it’ll get nice and hot. Gently push down the dough and transfer it to a floured cutting board. Turn the dough into 6 (or 8 to 9) even-sized pieces and shape them into firm balls. Roll them into 16cm (6.3″) discs while flipping them over now and then and lightly flouring them lightly.

    The pita’s only need 3 to 4 minutes before they start to puff up. That’s when they’re ready, but probably still a bit pale, I gave mine a minute or two extra for some colour and crunch.

Meal type: bread
Servings: 6 to 8
Copyright: © Es-factory.nl & kayotickitchen.com