Mar 21, 2013

Velveting Chicken II

Velveting Chicken II

Here’s the frying technique I promised you earlier this week, when posting the water technique. I thought it silly to reshoot the recipe—it’s the same marinade after all—so I borrowed some photos from my earlier posting.

I’m leaning towards the water technique. It’s easy because you can marinate and poach the chicken in the morning, store it in the fridge and add it to your stir-fry at night! Chicken poached using the oil technique must be used within the hour.

Plus, and this is a biggie, peanut oil is pretty expensive in the Netherlands. I can see how this would be perfect for Chinese restaurants, but for me at home, I think I’ll stick to the water technique.

You can also use the white velvet marinade and stir-fry without poaching. Will try that sometime later, I can see how it will crisp up the outside of the chicken while keeping it silky on the inside!

Seriously, I’m having way too much fun with this.

 

Ingredients:

1 pound boneless chicken breast
1 large egg-white
1 tbsp Chinese rice vinegar
1 tsp kosher salt (or 1/2 a tsp regular salt)
1 tbsp cornstarch
2 or 3 cups peanut oil
(enough oil to fully submerge your chicken strips)

 

Directions: 

Start by thinly slicing your chicken.
Velveting Chicken

Grab a big bowl and separate the egg. We only use the egg-white.
Velveting Chicken

Add the rice vinegar, salt and cornstarch to it and whisk until you end up with a silky marinade.
Velveting Chicken

Add your chicken.
Velveting Chicken

Stir well and make sure all pieces are coated.
Velveting Chicken

Cover the bowl with cling film and store it in the fridge for at least 30 minutes.
Velveting Chicken

 
Fast forward to a few hours later. Remove the chicken from the fridge and let it come to room temperature for a bit.
 

If you only sliced one or two chicken breasts and there’s more marinade, drain it in a colander first. Mine just coated the chicken.
Velveting Chicken

Pour layer of oil in your wok, skillet or pan deep enough to submerge the chicken. This depends on the amount of chicken, but it will roughly be 2 to 3 cups.
Velveting Chicken II

 
Now we don’t want to deep-fry the chicken, that will dry it out. We merely poach it in oil. The chicken should never, never, never sizzle. It might give an occasional tiny bubble, but that’s about it. The oil needs to be 130C (275F) for this to happen.
 

Used my jam thermometer for the job. Hey, it worked. Heat the oil over low to medium heat.
Velveting Chicken II

Add the chicken. Test a piece first: if it sizzles, your oil is too hot. 
Velveting Chicken II

Add the chicken, stir to prevent them from sticking together and wait for them to turn white. This will take less time than it did with the water technique, about 30 seconds or so.
 

Remove the chicken and, voila, it’s ready to be added to your stir-fry now.
Velveting Chicken II

I’ve cooked so many Chinese dishes this past week. Specifically Dutch-Chinese dishes. Will share recipes later!
Velveting Chicken II

 
Note:

Using either one of these techniques also allows you to velvet shrimp or meat! Meat and pork needs to be velveted in oil, though.
 

Velveting Chicken II
Ingredients
    1 pound boneless chicken breast
    1 large egg-white
    1 tbsp Chinese rice vinegar
    1 tsp kosher salt (or 1/2 a tsp regular salt)
    1 tbsp cornstarch
    2 or 3 cups peanut oil
    (enough oil to fully submerge the chicken)

Directions
    Thinly slice your chicken. Separate the egg and put the white in a big bowl. Add the rice vinegar, cornstarch and salt to it and whisk until you have a silky marinade.

    Add your chicken, make sure all pieces are coated, cover with cling film and store in the fridge for at least 30 minutes. Once ready to use it you remove the chicken from the fridge and let it come to room temperature for a bit.

    f you only sliced one or two chicken breasts and there’s more marinade, drain it in a colander first. Mine just coated the chicken.

    Pour layer of oil in your wok, skillet  or pan deep enough to submerge the chicken. This depends on the amount, but it will roughly be 2 to 3 cups. Heat the oil over low to medium heat. Now we don’t want to deep-fry the chicken, that will dry it out. We merely poach it in oil. The chicken should never, never, never sizzle. It might give an occasional tiny bubble, but that’s about it. The oil needs to be 130C (275F) for this to happen.

    Add the chicken, stir to prevent them from sticking together and wait for them to turn white. This will take very little time, about 30 seconds or so. Remove the chicken and now it’s ready to be added to your stir-fry now. Use within an hour after frying!

    Look on kayotickitchen.com if you want to use the water technique.

Meal type: Marinade, Poaching, Poultry, Chinese
Servings: 4
Copyright: © kayotickitchen.com
Mar 18, 2013

Velveting Chicken

For years I wondered how Chinese restaurants manage to keep their chicken so moist and tender. But now I wonder no more. There was little I could find on Dutch forums or websites, so I’m pretty sure I’ll make a Dutchie (or two) happy today. Also, I promised Sylvia Witteman I’d spread the word and fear her wrath if I don’t. If you want to start cooking your own Chinese…