Nov 27, 2013

Shredded Potato Casserole

Shredded Potato Casserole

It’s been too long since I last posted a potato side dish. I don’t do well without my potatoes, so here goes.

When a friend of mine shot me an email asking me if I still had a can of Campbell’s in my pantry and threw words around like ‘funeral potatoes’, I was intrigued. I mean, funeral potatoes… seriously? Are you pulling my leg? What the heck? After she explained what it meant and how it got to have this (for a Dutch girl) rather peculiar name, we realised it all boiled down to cultural differences.

That’s why I think this is a fun recipe for the Dutchies/Europeans. I’m pretty sure this dish is very common around America—one you’ll probably find in many church cookbooks, but it sure was new to me.

I gave it a go and the result is an almost rösti-like casserole with a very distinct flavour and texture. We loved it!

 

Ingredients:

2 pound potatoes
1/2 medium onion
1 1/2 cup grated cheese (mine was aged Gouda)
5 tbsp sour cream
1 can cream of chicken soup (or 1/2 can concentrated Unox cream of mushroomsoup)
1 1/2 tsp kosher salt
1/4 to 1/2 tsp black pepper
1/2 tsp sweet paprika powder
1/2 cup panko
3 tbsp grated Parmesan
pinch of dried parsley
pinch of dried chili flakes (optional)

 

Directions:

Peel and grate 1/2 an onion. You really don’t want to go overboard on the onion thing or it will be way too overpowering.
Shredded Potato Casserole

There it is. One of the last cans. I was happy to sacrifice it for the sake of blogging!
Shredded Potato Casserole

Grab a bowl and combine the panko, Parmesan, parsley and (optionally) chili flakes or pinch of cayenne.
Shredded Potato Casserole

Grate the cheese.
Shredded Potato Casserole

Peel and coarsely grate the potatoes. You gotta work fast or the potatoes will turn brown, so work it! Mix the potatoes with the grated onion.
Shredded Potato Casserole

Add the soup, sour cream, salt, pepper and paprika powder.
Shredded Potato Casserole

Looks like a big ole mess, I know, but bear with me. (be glad I caught my bear-bare typo before I hit publish!)
Shredded Potato Casserole

Mix it all up, add the grated cheese and transfer it to a casserole.
Shredded Potato Casserole

Top with the panko and Parmesan mix. That’s it.
Shredded Potato Casserole

 
Pop it in a preheated oven at 180Cº (355Fº) for 40 to 45 minutes and check for readiness. Keep in mind that your oven might be calibrated differently than mine and your casserole might need more or less cooking time, so start checking after 30 minutes and keep an eye on it.
 

This was so good with a juicy steak and green beans! And boy, was I glad that no one had to die first.
Shredded Potato Casserole

Shredded Potato Casserole
Ingredients
    2 pound potatoes
    1/2 medium onion
    1 1/2 cup grated cheese (mine was aged Gouda)
    5 tbsp sour cream
    1 can cream of chicken soup (or 1/2 can concentrated Unox cream of mushroomsoup)
    1 1/2 tsp kosher salt
    1/4 to 1/2 tsp black pepper
    1/2 tsp sweet paprika powder
    1/2 cup panko
    3 tbsp grated Parmesan
    pinch of dried parsley
    pinch of dried chili flakes (optional)

Directions
    Grab a bowl and combine the panko, Parmesan, parsley and (optionally) chili flakes or pinch of cayenne. Use a coarse grater to grate the onion, cheese and (peeled) potatoes. Mix it all up and add the soup, sour cream, salt, pepper and paprika powder and transfer it to a casserole. Top with the panko and parmesan mix. Pop it in a preheated oven at 180Cº (355Fº) for 40 to 45 minutes and check for readiness.

Meal type: Side-dish
Servings: 6
Copyright: © kayotickitchen.com

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    31 Comments »

    1. 1

      It definately looks like a tasty side dish. You leave us all curious though, as to what the story behind the name is! My need for closure compells me to ask for further explanation :)

      Ilse on Nov 27, 2013 @ 4:23 pm Reply
      1. I could try and explain, but this is probably a lot easier and clearer :)

        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Funeral_potatoes

        ‘After funeral dinners’ are something so undutch that it took me a moment to understand what she meant. I think it’s a beautiful tradition. Wish it would become part of the Dutch culture as well.

        Kay on Nov 27, 2013 @ 4:45 pm Reply
        1. That seems like something they should implement here too. Better than coffee and a slice of cake.
          So I made these potatoes immediately last night (yes they looked that good). I doubled the recipe and used a can of condensed mushroom soup (Unox) instead of chicken soup. Also I halved the amount of salt (1.5 tsp recommended, so 3 for me, and I used 2). While sprinkling over the second tsp of salt however, it started to feel wrong, so I didn’t put in the third. Although I really liked the dish overall, it was still pretty salty. And coming from me (I love salt), that’s quite a thing. Also, though this may be due to my oven, the sides and bottom kind of turned into a mash (still tasty!), while the middle was still raw-ish. Any idea how to improve this?

          Ilse on Nov 28, 2013 @ 2:09 pm Reply
          1. Keep in mind that I use kosher salt… which is double the volume of regular salt  :)

            I didn’t have the problem with the center not being cooked enough. Maybe next give it an extra 10 to 15 minutes next time? You can cover the casserole with foil so the top won’t burn.

            Kay on Nov 28, 2013 @ 2:26 pm
    2. 2

      I’ve heard of them but have never had them and I live in the US!  I may have to make that now because it sounds fabulous! Thanks!

      Brandi G on Nov 27, 2013 @ 4:56 pm Reply
    3. 3

      May I ask what the Dutch do there after the funeral?  No gathering? i am sure that our traditions have been Americanized over the many years that our families have been here in the US. 

      Leisa Den Beste on Nov 27, 2013 @ 5:16 pm Reply
      1. Not really. The night before the actual funeral or cremation there’s a gathering at the funeral home. That’s the only night everyone comes to pay their respects to the deceased and their families. Food is usually not a apart of all this, aside from a cup of coffee usually served with a slice of cake.

        I really think these after funeral dinners and also how family, friends and neighbours bring food over after in the weeks after someone passed away is a beautiful tradition that I truly wish we would adopt.

        Kay on Nov 27, 2013 @ 5:34 pm Reply
    4. 4

      Hi, do you think these could be frozen for later use. If you can freeze this dish would you before or after baking?
      Thanks for your thoughts.
       
      Janet

      Janet on Nov 27, 2013 @ 5:48 pm Reply
      1. I actually tried it after baking. There was quite a bit and since I have as family of three, I froze half of it and reheated them several days later. Worked like a charm for me. The structure did change slightly, but not in an annoying way.

        Kay on Nov 27, 2013 @ 5:52 pm Reply
    5. 5

      Kay, these potatoes are always in high demand for any occasion! I have even made them using defrosted “hash browns” when I’ve been requested to bring them to the office for Friday breakfast. I make a version that is like a stuffed baked potato with sour cream, cream cheese and crispy bacon bits too die for but definitely bad for the diet if eaten too often!

      Tammi on Nov 27, 2013 @ 6:11 pm Reply
    6. 6

      Many of us who are not from Utah make this dish and call it “Hash Brown Casserole.”  I love it with breakfast when I have house guests.

      Deb in Indiana on Nov 27, 2013 @ 7:07 pm Reply
    7. 7

      Do you think you could use another soup for this, maybe mushroomsoep? I ask this, because i am a vegetarian. It looks delicious, but i am a bit worried about the fat in the soup;-)

      Femke on Nov 28, 2013 @ 7:56 am Reply
    8. 8

      These remind me of the Swedish dish Janssons Frestelse (Jansson’s Temptation) which is a shredded potato casserole with added sprat (spiced herring) and sautéed onions.
      We serve it for Christmas and sometimes Easter and it’s often served as “vickning” which is a simple hot meal served late at night after a big party.

      Lotta on Nov 28, 2013 @ 10:39 am Reply
    9. 9

      I thought of Jansson’s Temptation, too! Finns make something similar without crumbs on top.  JANSSONIN KIUSAUS  can be made with julienne or thinly sliced potatoes. Yum!                                       

      Janet on Nov 29, 2013 @ 6:36 pm Reply
    10. 10

      Thank you Kay for telling of the Dutch Funeral tradition.   It is nice that the melting pot in the US have the tradition of bring meals to the family.  I believe it is helpful to the ones that are saddened by the loss of a good friend to feel they are helping to comfort the family with their gift of a meal or dish. 

      Leisa Den Beste on Nov 30, 2013 @ 5:02 pm Reply
    11. 11

      This is completely out of nowhere, but I was thinking today how much I’d love for you to post your recipe for gado gado! Combining a bunch of Conimex things from the Albert Heijn just does not cut it, but the Dutch-Indo kitchen intimidates me a lot.

      Kate on Nov 30, 2013 @ 6:01 pm Reply
    12. 12

      Kate is Gado Gado a spicy dish?  What type of ingredients are in it?  So many questions! Lol 

      Leisa Den Beste on Nov 30, 2013 @ 7:49 pm Reply
      1. Not really. Gado Gado is an Indonesian salad of mixed raw and cooked vegetables, potatoes -sometimes also chicken- with peanut sauce. Gado Gado literally means mix mix. You can spice up the peanut sauce, though.

        Kay on Dec 1, 2013 @ 8:39 am Reply
        1. Great idea!

          Kay on Dec 1, 2013 @ 8:39 am Reply
    13. 13

      Looking forward to another tasty recipe! 

      Leisa Den Beste on Dec 1, 2013 @ 4:39 pm Reply
    14. 14

      I’d be happy to send you all the Campbells soup you want in exchange for some real Gouda cheese.Not the stuff they try to pass off over here

      Jack on Dec 1, 2013 @ 7:02 pm Reply
      1. I tasted what they try and pass for Gouda cheese during a visit to the US. I nearly cried.

        Kay on Dec 1, 2013 @ 7:30 pm Reply
    15. 15

      PS.never heard of funeral potato’s and my family is from the southern US

      Jack on Dec 1, 2013 @ 7:03 pm Reply
    16. 16

      Wasn’t that smiling cow stuff was it?We do have some great cheddar and others tho.I’m a cheese nut.

      Jack on Dec 1, 2013 @ 7:36 pm Reply
      1. You mean La Vaiche Qui Ri? No, that’s quite different from Gouda cheese :)
        Cheddars are rare and darn expensive here! Hard to come by too.

        Kay on Dec 1, 2013 @ 8:01 pm Reply
    17. 17

      Just bought some Gorgonzola from Wisconsin(great stuff).Gonna make my blue cheese burgers.Friends go nuts over them

      Jack on Dec 1, 2013 @ 7:43 pm Reply
    18. 18

      Contact me at my e-mail.Be happy to make a trade,I’ll send the first package.No charge.i just love your site and food.Yummmmmm

      Jack on Dec 1, 2013 @ 8:06 pm Reply
    19. 19

      Did you try to contact Campbells yourself?bet you could get it shipped thru them.

      Jack on Dec 1, 2013 @ 8:21 pm Reply
    20. 20

      We make these alot, especially when we have a big crowd. You can make them ahead of time and just pop them in the over. We’ve always make them with frozen packaged hasbrown/shredded potatoes. Also, sometimes I crush potato chips on top :)

      Lisa (MidwestWoman) on Dec 2, 2013 @ 4:42 pm Reply
      1. Now she tells me! Potato chips on top? You’re such an evil enabler. I love it :)

        Kay on Dec 2, 2013 @ 5:03 pm Reply
    21. 21

      Who cares about the name ! They are epic ! :D
      By the way I am American-Dutch ! lol ! :D

      Holidays on Dec 4, 2013 @ 7:38 am Reply

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