Mar 17, 2014

Shakshuka

Shakshuka

I adore these simple one-pan dishes. Especially those where you throw a few eggs into the equation and poach them in whatever it is you’re making. In that light, me sharing this classic Middle Eastern dish called Shashuka probably doesn’t come as a big surprise to some of you.

And really, if this is the first you’ve heard of it let me tell you that you’ve been missing out… we need to get you up to speed straight away. One bite and you’ll be hooked for life. Just as I was.

What’s Shakshuka? Basically they’re eggs poached in a mildly spicy sauce made from slow-cooked onions, bell peppers, garlic and tomatoes spruced up with a hint of smoked paprika, saffron and, in my case, chipotle chili powder. Can you say perfect lunch?

Granted, this dish takes a little time to prepare, but when done right it will be absolutely mind-blowing and definitely worth it.

 
Ingredients:

1 large onion
1 red bell pepper
1 yellow bell pepper
1 14 oz can tomatoes
1/2 tsp smoked paprika
1/2 tsp chipotle chili powder
1 tsp cumin seeds
2 garlic cloves
pinch of saffron strands
4 large eggs
3 tbsp olive oil
salt & pepper

 
Directions:

My bell pepper appeared to be with child. Two for the price of one. Wash them well!
Shakshuka

Finely slice the bell peppers and turn the onion into half-rings.
Shakshuka

Heat the oil. Preferably in an oven-proof skillet.
Shakshuka

Add the cumin seeds and cook them for a minute or 3 while stirring now and then.
Shakshuka

Add the onions and cook them, over low heat, for about 10 minutes. Until golden brown.
Shakshuka

Time to add the sliced peppers.
Shakshuka

Crush the garlic in there and cook everything, over low heat, for 20 to 25 minutes while stirring now and then. Until the peppers are all soft and sweet.
Shakshuka

Gives you plenty time to chop the canned tomatoes. We’ll also be needing the juice.
Shakshuka

As soon as the peppers are soft you crumble in the saffron strands and stir in the smoked paprika powder and chipotle chili powder.
Shakshuka

Add the tomatoes and season with salt and pepper to taste. For me 1 tsp kosher salt was enough. Let it simmer for 10 minutes over low heat.
Shakshuka

Break the eggs in a separate bowl. One of my eggs had a double yolk! Cannot be a coincidence after the pregnant pepper!
Shakshuka

 
This turned out to be a pretty fruitful recipe. Consider yourself warned.
 

As soon as the sauce is done simmering on the stove, you level out the peppers a bit.
Shakshuka

 
If your skillet isn’t oven-proof this is your cue to transfer everything to a casserole.
 

Make an opening in the sauce and pour the egg in there. Do this for all the eggs.
Shakshuka

Season the eggs with salt and pepper.
Shakshuka

 
Place the skillet in a preheated oven and bake them at 180Cº (350Fº) for 10 to 12 minutes, until the egg white is set but the yolk is still runny.
 

Serve with lots of crusty bread! Perfect lunch or light dinner.
Shakshuka

Recipe adapted from River Cottage

Shakshuka
Ingredients
    1 large onion
    1 red bell pepper
    1 yellow bell pepper
    1 14 oz can tomatoes
    1/2 tsp smoked paprika
    1/2 tsp chipotle chili powder
    1 tsp cumin seeds
    2 garlic cloves
    pinch of saffron strands
    4 large eggs
    3 tbsp olive oil
    salt & pepper

Directions
    Wash and finely slice the bell peppers. Turn the onion into half-rings. Heat the oil, preferably in an oven-proof skillet. Add the cumin seeds and cook them for a minute or 2,5 to 3 minutes stirring now and then. Add the onions and cook them, over low heat, for about 10 minutes. Until golden brown. Add your sliced peppers and crush the garlic in there. Cook everything, over low heat, for 20/25 minutes while stirring now and then until the peppers are soft.

    Chop the canned tomatoes. As soon as the peppers are soft you crumble in the saffron strands, add the smoked paprika powder and chipotle chili powder and add the tomatoes. Season with salt and pepper to taste. For me 1 tsp kosher salt was enough. Let it simmer for 10 minutes over low heat then taste to check the seasoning and adjust when needed.

    Break the eggs in a separate bowl. If your skillet isn’t oven-proof this is your sure to transfer everything to a casserole. Make 4 holes in the sauce and pour the eggs in there. Season them with a pinch of salt and pepper. Place the skillet in a preheated oven and bake them at 180Cº (350Fº) for 10 to 12 minutes, until the egg white is set but the yolk is still runny. Serve with lots of crusty bread.

Meal type: Lunch, Light Dinner
Servings: 4
Copyright: © kayotickitchen.com

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    14 Comments »

    1. 1

      I made something similar once with anchovies mixed in with the tomatoes but this with chipotle powder sounds much better!

      Bailie @ The Hemborg Wife on Mar 17, 2014 @ 11:23 am Reply
    2. 2

      I love  Shakshuka, pure comfort food.  This is what’s for dinner tonight!

      Debbie Clarke on Mar 17, 2014 @ 11:42 am Reply
    3. 3

      Ooo, Shakshuka. Toen ik er via Ottolenghi er een jaar of twee geleden voor het eerst van had gehoord ontbijt ik er zo’n beetje om de zondag mee. Heel, heel, heel erg lekker! :) 

      Ilona on Mar 17, 2014 @ 5:45 pm Reply
    4. 4

      Yummmm
      Kende t al  …heerlijk indeed…!   Maar waar koop jij chipotle powder ??
       

      Dorien on Mar 17, 2014 @ 7:52 pm Reply
      1. Ik heb hem bij gekruid.com gekocht maar die hebben hem nu niet meer, zag ik tot mijn grote verdriet.

        Kay on Mar 17, 2014 @ 9:57 pm Reply
          1. Bedankt voor het doorgeven! raakte al lichtelijk in paniek bij het idee dat mijn poeder op zou raken en ik geen andere meer kon kopen :)

            Kay on Mar 18, 2014 @ 12:10 pm
    5. 5

      Mmmm, I love Shakshuka.  Especially with a  little bacon.
      Kay, tell me about your cast iron skillet.  It looks like my skillets, hand me downs from 100+ years ago.  
      Do cast iron skillets and griddles have a history of use in the Netherlands?  I am always fascinated with the small likenesses and differences in everyday things.
      I always think of cast iron as frontier cookware.  My grandparents and their grandparents used cast iron pans, and a lot of farm cooks still use them today.  Then I started reading food blogs and found a whole cast iron cookware cult.  Did you discover how great the cast iron skillet is from tradition, or because foodies made them a little trendy?
      Spring is almost here — I have daffodils sprouting and snowdrops almost blooming.  Happy spring!
       

      Deb in Indiana on Mar 17, 2014 @ 9:52 pm Reply
      1. Great eye, Deb! It’s a Lodge that I had shipped to me from the US :)
        In the Netherlands these type of skillet are mainly found in the home of die-hard foodies or bloggers, the rest of the Dutch people mainly use non-stick skillets or Le Crueset if they’re using cast iron.

        Happy spring!

        Kay on Mar 17, 2014 @ 10:01 pm Reply
        1. wow! It’s too bad that cast iron isn’t more commonly known or used in Europe, except by foodies and bloggers. Here in the US, if you have a good eye and your timing is perfect, you can find really good quality, well seasoned cast iron skillet from either Thrift store, Rummage Sale, Estate sles or neighborhood Garage/Yard sales.
          Unfortunately, I come from a large family (9 kids) and my mother was from a family of 17 surviving, that non of the cast iron was passed down to me. Rather than “crying over spelt milk”, so to speak, I acquired my from church rummage sale. I love the even heating of these great old pans!

          Cynthia C. on Mar 18, 2014 @ 1:09 am Reply
          1. supposed to have been spilt milk

            Cynthia C. on Mar 18, 2014 @ 1:11 am
          2. It’s probably because cast iron is really expensive here. A basic le creuset, for example, costs us easily $300. It was much cheaper for me to buy and have the logdge shipped to me from the US than it was to buy it here!

            I’m the youngest of 9 :)

            Kay on Mar 18, 2014 @ 9:52 am
    6. 6

      What an absolutely drool worthy recipe! I recently made something similar – Eggs in Purgatory – but yours is quite a bit more complex with flavorings. I can’t wait to try this!

      Lana @ Never Enough Thyme on Mar 18, 2014 @ 7:59 pm Reply
      1. I had to grin when I saw we had a similar idea. Yours look great!

        Kay on Mar 19, 2014 @ 3:11 pm Reply

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