Jun 17, 2012

Semur Daging Djawa

Semur Daging Djawa

Semur is derived from the Dutch word ‘smoor‘, which means smothered. Daging lembu is beef and Djawa means Java. Javanese beef stew.

It was one of my favorite meals as a kid. I loved coming home from school and getting hit with the smell of this slow-braised beef with sweet soy sauce, onion and warm spices simmering. This is the only sweet dish I really like. Once you have a bite of this, you’ll never be the same.

Oh, for the record, I handed my camera over to my love for this posting. Yes, I really did.

Well, handed it over… he had to pry it from my hands seeing as I was curled around it in fetal position protecting it with my body. But now, after seeing the result of his hard labor, I must say; I taught him well.

Thanks, babe. A million.

 
Ingredients:

2 pounds boneless beef chuck
4 garlic cloves
thumb size piece ginger
2 onions
1 chili pepper
1/4 tsp ground nutmeg
1 tsp ground coriander seed
1 tsp laos (if you can get it)
2 tbsp tomato paste
1 heaping tbsp tamarind paste (or a tbsp vinegar)
1 tsp brown sugar
1/3 cup kecap manis (sweet soy sauce)
1 1/2 tsp salt
1/4 tsp pepper
3/4 cup water
3 tbsp oil

Optional: 1/4 to 1/2 tsp five spice powder

 

Directions:

I used my slow cooker for this, but you can also simmer this on your stove-top.
 

The beef. Lots of it.
Semur Daging Djawa

Cut it in bit-sized pieces. Glad I took at least 1 shot myself. It’s an honor thing.
Semur Daging Djawa

Grab a big bowl and mix the brown sugar with the sweet soy sauce.
Semur Daging Djawa

Add 1 heaping tbsp tamarind paste. No paste? No problem. Just add a tbsp vinegar instead.
tamarind

Add 1 tsp salt, grate the ginger in there and stir well.
Semur Daging Djawa

Add your beef cubes. Oh, wait, I shot this one as well!
Semur Daging Djawa

Let it sit there and marinate for 15 to 30 minutes.
Semur Daging Djawa

Remove the seeds and finely mince the chili pepper. You can also use 1/2 of it, if you like, but this won’t make it really hot.
Semur Daging Djawa

Mince the onions.
Semur Daging Djawa

And grate the garlic.
Semur Daging Djawa

Mix the spices. I love what a heaping 1/4 tsp of chinese five-spice did to the stew. Very fragrant.
Semur Daging Djawa

 
It’s not part of the original recipe, so I won’t scold you for leaving it out. Not this time.
 

Heat the oil and sauté the onion and chili pepper for 5 minutes.
Semur Daging Djawa

Add the spice mix, nutmeg and garlic and cook for another 2 minutes.
Semur Daging Djawa

Next, add the beef cubes. Marinade and all.
Semur Daging Djawa

Cook it for 4 to 5 minutes until the beef loses its rawness. Because of all the liquid the beef won’t brown, of course. That’s okay.
Semur Daging Djawa

Stir in the tomato paste and cook for a minute to sweeten it up.
Semur Daging Djawa

There’s. That’s what I was aiming for. Or better said; what he was aiming for.
Semur Daging Djawa

Pour in the water.
Semur Daging Djawa

 
When you cook this on your stove top, add roughly 1/3 cup water extra.
 

Season with 1/2 tsp salt and sprinkle the black pepper in there.
Semur Daging Djawa

Cover and cook on low for at least 8 to 9 hours. Then check the seasoning and adjust where needed.
Semur Daging Djawa

 
Simmer for at least 3 hours when cooking this on your stove-top!
 

I did help plating. A little. Serve with lots of steamed rice and steamed Chinese cabbage or paksoi.
Semur Daging Djawa

I love you, man. No, really. I also love this beef stew. Not bad for someone who can’t cook!
Semur Daging Djawa

Just how good does this look?
Semur Daging Djawa

 

Semur Daging Djawa
Ingredients
    2 pounds boneless beef chuck
    4 garlic cloves
    thumb size piece ginger
    2 onions
    1 chili pepper
    1/4 tsp ground nutmeg
    1 tsp ground coriander seed
    1 tsp laos (if you can get it)
    2 tbsp tomato paste
    1 heaping tbsp tamarind (or a tbsp vinegar)
    1 tsp brown sugar
    1/3 cup kecap manis (sweet soy sauce)
    1 1/2 salt
    1/4 tsp pepper
    3/4 cup water
    3 tbsp oil

    Optional: 1/4 to 1/2 tsp five spice powder

Directions
    I used my slow cooker for this, but you can also simmer this on your stove-top

    Cut the beef in bit-sized pieces. Grab a big bowl and mix the tamarind paste (or vinegar) and brown sugar with the sweet soy sauce. Add 1 tsp salt, grate the ginger in there and stir well. Marinate the beef in this for 15 to 30 minutes.

    Remove the seeds and finely mince the chili pepper. Mince the onions and grate the garlic. Mix the laos with the ground coriander seed, nutmeg and optionally the fice spice blend.

    Heat the oil and sauté the onion and chili pepper for 5 minutes. Add the spice mix, nutmeg and garlic and cook for another 2 minutes. Next, add the beef cubes. Marinade and all. Cook it for 4 to 5 minutes until the beef loses its rawness. Because of all the liquid the beef won’t brown, of course.

    Stir in the tomato paste and cook for a minute to sweeten it up. Pour in the water, season with 1/2 tsp salt and sprinkle the black pepper in there. Cover and cook on low for at least 8 to 9 hours. Then check the seasoning and adjust where needed.

    When you cook this on your stove top, add roughly 1/3 cup water extra! Serve with lots of steamed rice and steamed Chinese cabbage or paksoi.

Meal type: Indonesian food, stews, beef, main course
Servings: 4 to 6
Copyright: © kayotickitchen.com

    © kayotic.com
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    46 Comments »

    1. 1

      Oh yes please, this looks amazing.  I’m a huge fan of the flavor of tamarind do I know I would like this one!

      Kalyn on Jun 17, 2012 @ 4:51 pm Reply
    2. 2

      What piece of beef do you use for this?

      Thanks 

      Maria on Jun 17, 2012 @ 5:02 pm Reply
      1. Riblappen!

        Kay on Jun 17, 2012 @ 5:04 pm Reply
    3. 3

      Looks delicious. I love the serving bowls, where can I get one?

      Malene on Jun 17, 2012 @ 5:09 pm Reply
      1. In a store in the Netherlands called Marskramer.

        Kay on Jun 17, 2012 @ 5:23 pm Reply
    4. 4

      What is Laos?  Is it a spice??  TIA!  This looks yummy………we lived in Doenrade for 6 1/2 years and miss it a lot!

      Catherine on Jun 17, 2012 @ 5:47 pm Reply
      1. Laos is galangal (root) and used in many Indonesian dishes. It looks kinda like ginger but has a different, almost peppery, kind of flavor. Fresh galangal has a far better flavor but is hard to come by for me, so I use a powdered version.

        Kay on Jun 17, 2012 @ 6:42 pm Reply
    5. 5

      Looks so delicious! I love the step-by-step photos!
      I’m an Indonesian living in Switzerland, and I cook a lot of Indonesian food as it reminds me of home. Although I haven’t been able to find Kecap Manis ABC brand here :( So I’ve had to settle for the Thai version. Is it easy to find them in the Netherlands? 

      Ratri on Jun 17, 2012 @ 6:04 pm Reply
      1. I used to buy it at a toko downtown. Then I ran into it last week at the supermarket I always go to. Figures :)

        Kay on Jun 17, 2012 @ 6:12 pm Reply
      2. A friend of mine bought it online. 

        Marja on Jun 27, 2012 @ 9:28 pm Reply
    6. 6

      I think I’m going to be sending my husband on a trip to some of our ethnic groceries to get these ingredients, because this looks like something we would LOVE!

      Allyn on Jun 17, 2012 @ 7:00 pm Reply
    7. 7

      Kay, this looks ridiculously amazing.  I think i need to make space on next weeks menu plan for it.

      Juls (Pepper and Sherry) on Jun 18, 2012 @ 8:58 am Reply
    8. 8

      Yes in my household this is one of my favorite dishes :) I don’t cook it that long. It’s really tender by simmering it on the stove top for an hour.

      Arrisje on Jun 18, 2012 @ 2:04 pm Reply
      1. Beef always gets a minimum of 3 hours here. Simmering for only one hour is unthinkable here :)

        Kay on Jun 18, 2012 @ 2:06 pm Reply
    9. 9

      I want to live in your kitchen.

      Bev Weidner on Jun 18, 2012 @ 6:05 pm Reply
      1. Yes, great idea, Bev! Then you can cook for me :)

        Kay on Jun 19, 2012 @ 11:33 am Reply
    10. 10

      made this tonight. It was absolutely delicious. Served over Jasmine Rice with a salad and some white wine. Made us think we were back in the Neterlands. Thanks. I will be making more of your recipes.

      LUANN VANDErLIND ARNSON on Jun 19, 2012 @ 1:28 am Reply
    11. 11

      I’ve never had Indonesian food so I have nothing to compare it to, but the flavors were wonderful!

      Maria on Jun 19, 2012 @ 1:03 pm Reply
    12. 12

      Hi! Im making this right now and it smells gorgeous already!! can’t wait three hours to eat it!! One question though! I couldn’t find in the directions where to add the tamarind. I gave it a guess and added  it in the marinade… was that alright? Thanks fot the recipe!!

      Romi on Jun 19, 2012 @ 2:56 pm Reply
      1. Omg, only now seeing I forgot to add the tamarind photo! You’re right, it goes into the marinade. Photo has been added, so thanks for pointing it out.

        Kay on Jun 19, 2012 @ 3:11 pm Reply
        1. Thank YOU! We just devoured it!!  Delicioussssss!!!

          Romi on Jun 19, 2012 @ 8:17 pm Reply
    13. 13

      Hi Kay, really love how you named this recipes. But maybe you would like to add “Sapi” after “Daging”…. daging sapi means beef, daging only means meat. Just suggestion :)

      Philly McFadden on Jun 19, 2012 @ 6:02 pm Reply
      1. Well, Sapi means cow or bull (even more like buffalo—Kerbau—I vaguely remember) … which is a little too generic, I think :)

        Lambu/Lembu is another word for beef, but this is not always added to the name of the dish. So if you’re a foodblogger, feel free to add it. For me it’s not really necessary.

        Kay on Jun 19, 2012 @ 6:07 pm Reply
    14. 14

      I’m not a blogger, I’m just a big fans of your site. I didn’t mean to step on your toes by making the suggestion…. but as an Indonesian (lives in America), I thought there was something missing. You’re right, it’s not necessary to change it.  

      Philly McFadden on Jun 19, 2012 @ 6:44 pm Reply
      1. You didn’t step on my toes at all! I appreciate the comment :)

        Kay on Jun 19, 2012 @ 7:19 pm Reply
    15. 15

      Hi Kay,
      Je woont in Nederland dus ik hoop dat je het ook kan lezen.
      Ik volg je al heel lang en alles wat ik van je maak is heerlijk…….deze staat nu op….. en jongens wat ruikt het alleen al zalig.!!!
      Blijf vooral doorgaan!!!
       
      Groetjes Betty
       
       

      Betty on Jun 22, 2012 @ 2:05 pm Reply
      1. Maar ik ben gewoon een Nederlandse hoor! :)

         

        Kay on Jun 22, 2012 @ 2:15 pm Reply
    16. 16

      I have made this and it is currently about to be served for dinner!  It looks and smells amazing!

      Juls (Pepper and Sherry) on Jun 27, 2012 @ 7:24 pm Reply
    17. 17

      Wederom wat een heerlijke maaltijd. Ik had er sugar snaps en broccoli bij gewokt. Heerlijk was t! Groetjes vanuit curacao

      Simone on Jun 28, 2012 @ 5:48 pm Reply
    18. 18

      Got hold of Kecap Manis & fresh Galangal in a chinese Supermarket in Bristol. The Slow cooker did a 7 1/2 hr cook & the beef was falling apart but there wasn’t much sauce left, so added some homemade veg stock.
      Still tastes absolutely divine :)
      Will make again! 

      Jerry on Jun 30, 2012 @ 10:32 am Reply
    19. 19

      Hi Kay,
      I just came across your website and I have to give you a compliment, I just love it. I totally love that you add pictures step by step, that makes it so much easier. Please continue the good work. I will surely keep on visiting your website.

      Michelle on Jul 2, 2012 @ 3:12 pm Reply
    20. 20

      Apropos Jerry’s comment above, in the US, newer “crockpot” type slow cookers seem to run much hotter at “low” than the older models. Probably because of food safety concerns? I have a 25 year old crockpot, and a much newer slow cooker, and difference is remarkable.
      The latter “burns” and dries out food, something that never ever happens with the former. So, for longer cooking times, this is something to keep in mind, and to note that cooking times may need to be modified according to the make of your device/country of origin (???).

      gt on Jul 21, 2012 @ 12:32 pm Reply
    21. 21

      We hadden in onze studentenkeuken zowaar Laos en Ketoembar op voorraad. Het was heerlijk, al had ik op het fornuis wel een stuk meer dan 1/3 cup extra water nodig.

      Inge on Aug 29, 2012 @ 9:06 pm Reply
    22. 22

      I’m cooking it right now. It smells very good. Tell u later the result. Thanks, Kay. Love your recipes. Mariela

      Mariela on Nov 22, 2012 @ 8:47 pm Reply
    23. 23

      hi Kay,,,,, really love ur website,,,,,the food its amazing,,,,,i’m an indonesian living in australia,,,this semur recipe just taste just like my mama use to make,,,,,loveeee it,,,, looking forward to try all of ur recipe (i wish) lol

      dee on Nov 30, 2012 @ 10:51 am Reply
    24. 24

      Hello Kay, making this recipe right and really looking forward to taste it.
      But I find nowhere in the recipe where you add the Laos/Galangal, is it together with the spices? Do I do the same if I have fresh Galangal?

      Simon on Jan 13, 2013 @ 2:05 pm Reply
      1. Yup, you just mix all the spices in the bowl.

        Kay on Jan 13, 2013 @ 2:13 pm Reply
    25. 25

      Great recipe, thanks and respect :)

      Paajin on Jan 31, 2013 @ 3:33 pm Reply

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