Jan 16, 2012

Sambal Goreng Buncis

Sambal Goreng Buncis

I was trying to come up with a new beef stew recipe for Kayotic Kitchen. The best side for beef stew, in my opinion, is a crunchy green bean dish and steamed rice.

I already posted an Indonesian-style green beans recipe some time ago, but you can never have enough recipes for those green little fellas, right? Especially recipes that have an Indonesian influence. They’re so darn tasty.

Here’s an oldie that I tweaked a wee bit. I started out with a basic sambal goreng buncis but ended up changing it as I went. Don’t I always?

 
Ingredients:

1 1/2 pound beans
1 large onion
1 red bell pepper
1 garlic clove
1 big red chili pepper
thumb-size piece fresh ginger
1/2 tsp laos (ground galanga root)
1 tsp sereh (ground lemon grass)
1 tsp ketoembar (ground coriander seeds)
3 tbsp Kecap manis (sweet soy sauce)
2 tbsp high-heat cooking oil
5 tbsp coconut milk
salt to taste

 
Directions:

Here’s said beef stew before the 10 hour slow cook. It was everything I had hoped it would be… and then some.
Stew

 
But back to the beans.
 

Start with a seriously tangled pile of green beans. Had a lovely morning sun in my kitchen.
Sambal Goreng Buncis

Trim the ends, wash them and parboil them in salted water for 15 minutes. Don’t overcook them.
Sambal Goreng Buncis

 
Time to do some chopping.
 

Wash the red bell pepper, remove the seeds and slice it in thin strips.
Sambal Goreng Buncis

Cut an onion in half, give each half three parallel cuts towards the root, flip it over and slice it.
Sambal Goreng Buncis

 
Then I noticed I had run out of sambal. So I just used a chili pepper instead. It happens *shrugs*
 

Remove the seeds from the chili pepper (unless you want it really hot) mince it and grate the garlic and ginger.
Sambal Goreng Buncis

Mix the laos, lemongrass and ground coriander seeds.
Sambal Goreng Buncis

 
You can leave the laos out if you can’t get your hands on it, and the lemongrass can be replaced with fresh lemongrass that you bruise and cut in coarse pieces.
 

Drain the green beans and rinse them with cold water before you move on.
Sambal Goreng Buncis

You’ll be needing high-heat cooking oil, like peanut oil or sunflower oil. For Pete’s sake: don’t use olive oil for this one!
Sambal Goreng Buncis

Get your pan really hot, add the onions and stir fry them for a minute or two before adding the bell pepper. Give it 2 more minutes.
Sambal Goreng Buncis

In with chili pepper, garlic and and ginger. Give it another minute.
Sambal Goreng Buncis

Cook the spices along with the veggies for at least 30 seconds to get the flavors going.
Sambal Goreng Buncis

Time to add your beans. Stir-fry them along with the rest for a minute or two.
Sambal Goreng Buncis

Pour in the sweet soy sauce and coconut milk.
Sambal Goreng Buncis

Let it simmer for a few minutes while stirring now and then. At least until the beans have heated through.
Sambal Goreng Buncis

 
Taste the sauce to see if it needs an extra pinch of salt. Always taste what you’re doing.
 

This is what we want, for the sauce to cook down enough to coat the beans. It’s delicious.
Sambal Goreng Buncis

My favorite topping: fried onions. I always keep a bag or jar in the pantry to top these type of dishes with. Seroendeng is also really tasty.
Sambal Goreng Buncis

I’m pretty sure you’re gonna like this new spin on your green beans!
Sambal Goreng Buncis

Sambal Goreng Buncis
Ingredients
    1 1/2 pound beans
    1 large onion
    1 red bell pepper
    1 garlic clove
    1 big red chili pepper
    thumb-size piece fresh ginger
    1/2 tsp laos (ground galanga root)
    1 tsp sereh (ground lemon grass)
    1 tsp ketoembar (ground coriander seeds)
    3 tbsp Kecap manis (sweet soy sauce)
    2 tbsp high-heat cooking oil
    5 tbsp coconut milk
    salt to taste

Directions
    Trim the ends, wash them and parboil them in salted water for 15 minutes. Don’t overcook them. Drain them and rinse them with cold water to stop the cooking process. Wash the red bell pepper, remove the seeds and slice it in thin strips. Cut an onion in half, give each half three parallel cuts towards the root, flip it over and slice it.

    Remove the seeds from the chili pepper (unless you want it really hot) mince it and grate the garlic and ginger. Mix the laos, lemongrass and ground coriander seeds. You can leave the laos out if you can’t get your hands on it, and the lemongrass can be replaced with fresh lemongrass that you bruise and cut in coarse pieces.

    Get your pan with oil really hot, add the onions and stir fry them for a minute or two before adding the bell pepper. Give it 2 more minutes. In with chili pepper, garlic and and ginger. Give it another minute. Add the spices and stir for 30 seconds before adding the green beans.

    Stir-fry the beans for 2 minutes and add the sweet soy sauce an coconut milk. Let it simmer for a few minutes while stirring now and then. At least until the beans have heated through. Taste to see if the sauce needs some salt.

    Garnish with fried onions or seroendeng.

Meal type: side dish, vegetables, vegetarian
Servings: 4
Copyright: © kayotickitchen.com

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    9 Comments »

    1. 1

      It looks amazing, Kay! 

      Maria on Jan 16, 2012 @ 3:35 pm Reply
    2. 2

      Sounds fabulous!

      Kalyn on Jan 16, 2012 @ 5:39 pm Reply
    3. 3

      This has gotta taste AMAZING! You’re a genius in the kitchen, Kay.

      Jenna on Jan 16, 2012 @ 5:47 pm Reply
    4. 4

      those look really tasty.  looking forward to the recipe of the slowcooker beef stew you had them with too… ;)

      bricin on Jan 16, 2012 @ 7:36 pm Reply
    5. 5

      I just found your blog this morning. It’s fantastic! Thank you for including a vegetarian section. I’m excited to try the recipes especially the Sambal Goreng Buncis.

      Krista on Jan 21, 2012 @ 3:37 pm Reply
    6. 6

      I’ve been a big fans of your blog for quite sometime and I’m Indonesian..so yes, love it when I found the sambal goreng buncis post …..yummy :DDD
       

      Agnes Indy on Jan 28, 2012 @ 4:00 pm Reply
    7. 7

      One small tip on the fried unions (bawang goreng).  You can do it yourself easy and it taste so much beter.

      Cut 6 large white unions in small thin half rings. Put them in a mixing bowl with 2 tsp of flower (and a bit of salt), and  shake. Heat the oil on high heat in a frying pan or wadjan and add the unions per serving. Continue to stirring gently and wait until they begin to brown slightly. Remove the unions and let them drain on a paper sheet or towel. Occasionally shake the unions so that the oil remains on the paper sheet/towel.
      And Bob’s your uncle :)

      Erwin on May 24, 2012 @ 8:48 am Reply
      1. I use bawang so rarely that I just buy it.

        But you should try Brambang goreng. Occasionally I’l make that. It’s a similar preparation as bawang but it’s 10x better! It’s made from shallots and has so much flavor.

        Kay on May 24, 2012 @ 10:13 am Reply
    8. 8

      You’re so right, Kay. I must admit it. It’s made from small unions that have a level of sweetness to them. Shallots are a good substitude for sure.

      I forgot an important step in my recepe and that’s to sqeeze out any liquid from the unions or shallots after cutting. But you knew that already because I’m talking to a true kitchen princess (grovel grovel). :D

      Erwin on May 24, 2012 @ 12:07 pm Reply

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