May 29, 2014

Sambal Badjak

Sambal Badjak

I cannot imagine my life and cooking without sambal. It’s the most-often used condiment in our house. I have a wide array of sambals in my fridge, ranging anywhere from an extremely hot Surinamese to mellow, sweet and flavorful Indonesian sambals.

I add some to most things I cook. Heck, I don’t even think about it, and not just when cooking Indonesian or Surinamese. I use it to liven up stews, meatballs, soups, sandwiches, dips, vegetables and even mashes.

My personal favourite is sambal badjak: a more flavourful than spicy sambal making it perfect for every day use. The sambal is gently fried, really mellowing down the heat. Delicious.

I ran into a new, curried version in the store a few weeks ago and, wow, that stuff is addictive. Why didn’t I think of adding masala? Let’s do it now!

 

Ingredients:

7 oz/200gr chili peppers
9oz/250gr shallots
4 large garlic cloves
3 tbsp peanut or sunflower oil
3 tbsp fresh lemon juice
1 slice gula djawa (palm sugar) roughly 2oz/50gr
3 or 4 tbsp kecap (sweet soy sauce)
1/4 tsp trassie bakar powder
2 tsp curry masala
1/2 tsp ginger powder
1/2 tsp coriander powder

Optionally: 3 toasted and mashed kemirie nuts
1 tsp tomato paste

 

Directions:

This Vol Gas Sambal by lange Frans is what got this posting started in the first place. They mailed me a jar to try to, wow, love the stuff! Thanks Danielle!
Sambal Badjak

This gorgeous cobek was my mother’s day present. I was over the moon! It’s a flat mortar with a special pestle (ulek-ulek) used to make the bumbu (‘wet’ spice mixture) almost every Indonesian dish starts with.
Sambal Badjak

 
Of course you can use a food processor or immersion blender for this as well, but the result that comes closest to an authentic bumbu made in a cobek is by using a meat grinder with a fine hole plate, heard that from Lonny Gerungan.
 

That’s the route I’m taking today. No need to complicate things, right?
Sambal Badjak

Peel the shallots and garlic. Give the shallots a rough chop.
Sambal Badjak

You’re in control of the heat. Want it seriously hot? Just leave in the seeds and membranes.
Sambal Badjak

I chose to remove them after washing the peppers. This gives a really pleasant warmth to the dishes but mostly an amazing flavour. Chop the peppers.
Sambal Badjak

Even the trash looks cheerful and happy. Sorry, just couldn’t help noticing it.
Sambal Badjak

Mix it all up. Let’s hit it!
Sambal Badjak

Keep going ’til you run out of ingredients.
Sambal Badjak

The perfect consistency for sambal. Mushy, but with still a little structure.
Sambal Badjak

Whisk well. See? Perfect consistency.
Sambal Badjak

The gula djawa (palm sugar) is big part of the Indonesian kitchen. If you can’t buy it, replace it with dark brown sugar. Finely chop the palm sugar.
Sambal Badjak

Same goes for the trassie bakar powder (fermented ground shrimp) and kecap.
Sambal Badjak

Love what the masala did to the sambal! Mine was Nickerie Masala.
Sambal Badjak

Heat the oil and gently cook the pepper and onion mix for 5 minutes while stirring often.
Sambal Badjak

Add the trassie powder, the ground ginger and coriander, the curry powder and finally the gula djawa. Continue to cook (while stirring often) until the gula djawa has melted.
Sambal Badjak

Pour in the kecap and the lemon juice. Combine well. Add 3 tbsp kecap if you like it less sweet.
Sambal Badjak

Let it simmer over low heat, again, while stirring often.
Sambal Badjak

Let it simmer until the liquid has been mostly evaporated but the mixture is still moist.
Sambal Badjak

 
Let it cool off and transfer to a sterilized jar. You can keep the sambal in the fridge for about a week, drizzle a little oil on top. Use in stews, pickles, soups, sauces, marinades, dressings, meatballs, burgers, wings and what not.
 

This is what you need on your dinner table or in your kitchen!
Sambal Badjak

Sambal Badjak is pure, unadulterated love. Highly addictive. Don’t say I didn’t warn you.
Sambal Badjak

Sambal Badjak
Ingredients
    7 oz/200gr chili peppers
    9oz/250gr shallots
    4 large garlic cloves
    3 tbsp peanut or sunflower oil
    3 tbsp fresh lemon juice
    1 slice gula djawa (palm sugar) roughly 2oz/50gr
    3 or 4 tbsp kecap (sweet soy sauce)
    1/4 tsp trassie bakar powder
    2 tsp curry masala
    1/2 tsp ginger powder
    1/2 tsp coriander powder

    Optionally: 3 toasted and mashed kemirie nuts
    1 tsp tomato paste

Directions
    You can use a food processor or immersion blender for this as well, but the result that comes closest to an authentic bumbu made in a cobek is by using a meat grinder with a fine hole plate.

    Peel the shallots and garlic. Give the shallots a rough chop. You’re in control of the heat. Want it seriously hot? Just leave in the seeds and membranes. I chose to remove them after washing the peppers. This gives a really pleasant warmth to the dishes but mostly an amazing flavour. Chop the peppers. Mix it up and run it through the meat grinder and whisk well.

    Finely mince the gula djawa. Heat the oil and gently cook the pepper mix for 5 minutes while stirring often. Add the trassie bakar powder, curry masala, ground ginger and coriander and the gula djawa. Cook until the sugar has melted. Stir often.

    Pour in the kecap (3 tbsp if you like it less sweet) and lemon juice and simmer until the liquid has been mostly evaporated but the mixture is still moist. Let it cool off and transfer to a sterilized jar. You can keep the sambal in the fridge for about a week, drizzle a little oil on top.

Meal type: BIndonesian, Condiments
Servings: 1
Copyright: © kayotickitchen.com

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    5 Comments »

    1. 1

      This looks freaking delicious! Never heard or tried this type of sambal before, usually just go for sambal belacan. Will try this out!!!

      Farah @ The Cooking Jar on May 30, 2014 @ 12:42 am
      1. It is! Such a flavour-maker.

        Kay on May 31, 2014 @ 4:12 pm
    2. 2

      mantab, my favorite sambal.

      Amallia @DesireToEat on Aug 4, 2014 @ 3:21 pm
    3. 3

      We are trying to perfect a sambal badjak recipe…can you share with me the type of red peppers you used in your recipe?

      We are in the US and red peppers are seasonal…trying to possibly buy them when in season and freeze.

      Trudy de Gruiter on Aug 8, 2014 @ 6:13 pm
    4. 4

      Hej! Heb deze van de week gemaakt en hij is geweldig! Thanks!

      ruud on Oct 4, 2014 @ 3:39 pm

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