Dec 30, 2013

Oliebollen

Oliebollen

What can I say about oliebollen? No new years eve will ever be complete without this doughnut-like pastry that’s so firmly embedded into our Dutch culture. Where it should stay forever, too.

This classic oliebollen recipe has been on my to-blog list for many years now but somehow I never got around to shooting the recipe; things are always so crazy busy for me around new years.

This is one of the better oliebollen recipes out there. It belongs to a fellow blogger of mine; Gerrit Jan, who is the author of Eetschrijven. It’s the only recipe I’ve ever used and I’m not planning on changing that either. I do omit the candied peel he adds to his dough because my guys aren’t crazy about it.

Making your own oliebollen is definitely worth the work you put into it because they taste so much better than anything store-bought! So what are you waiting for? Go bake oliebollen!

Happy new year, everyone!

 

Ingredients:

3.5oz/100gr raisins
1.7oz/50gr currants
17.6oz/500gr all-purpose flour
1 large egg
1 tbsp sugar
1 tsp salt
1 tbsp instant yeast
1 1/2 tsp ground cinnamon
1 oz butter (no margarine!)
2 tbsp milk
zest from 1 lemon
1 + 2/3 cup club soda
1 granny smith (roughly 3 oz)
2 or 3 liters sunflower or peanut oil for deep-frying

(all ingredients need to be room at temperature)

 

Directions:

Start by washing the raisins and currants. Weld them in hot water for about 30 minutes.
Oliebollen

In your mixer bowl you combine the flour with the sugar and salt.
Oliebollen

Wash the lemon and get the zest. Make sure you only use the yellow skin; the white pith underneath is very bitter.
Oliebollen

Melt the butter, add the milk and nuke it for another 10 to 15 seconds until everything’s luke-warm. Whisk well. You can also use a pan, of course.
Oliebollen

Add the instant yeast, cinnamon and lemon zest and mix it all up.
Oliebollen

You need sparkling water. Club soda in the US, I think? Room-temperature as well.
Oliebollen

Add the egg to the flour, mix it in and slowly pour in the club soda. Finally, you whisk in the butter and yeast mix.
Oliebollen

Dab the raisins/currants dry and peel and finely chop the apple. You should end up with roughly 3 oz apple.
Oliebollen

Fold it into the batter. Cover the bowl with a damp cloth and store it in an draft-free place for an hour to an hour and a half.
Oliebollen

Fast forward to 90 minutes later. The dough has risen beautifully. It will be a firm batter, though!
Oliebollen

Heat the sunflower or peanut oil (I used my deep-fryer) and stir the batter with a wooden spoon for a few minutes while letting the oil come to temperature.
Oliebollen

 
The oil should be exactly 180Cº (355Fº).
 

Use a large ice-scoop and dip it into the hot oil for a second or so before grabbing a spoonful of batter. Level the spoon against the side of the bowl.
Oliebollen

Drop the batter into the hot oil and give them 3 minutes on each side. Use a fork to flip them over.
Oliebollen

Line a colander with paper towels to store the oliebollen while you continue to bake. I made 18 oliebollen with this amount of batter.
Oliebollen

Generously sprinkle them with confectioners sugar right before serving them.
Oliebollen

Oliebollen can be eaten warm, luke-warm or even cold, but I think they’re best when they’re luke-warm. Instead of using your microwave to reheat them, it’s best to just give a bowl filled with oliebollen 15 to 20 minutes in an oven at 100Cº (210Fº).

Oliebollen
Ingredients
    3.5oz/100gr raisins
    1.7oz/50gr currants
    17.6oz/500gr all-purpose flour
    1 large egg
    1 tbsp sugar
    1 tsp salt
    1 tbsp instant yeast
    1 1/2 tsp ground cinnamon
    1 oz butter (no margarine!)
    2 tbsp milk
    zest from 1 lemon
    1 + 2/3 cup club soda
    1 granny smith (roughly 3 oz)
    2 or 3 liters sunflower or peanut oil for deep-frying

    (all ingredients need to be room at temperature)

Directions
    Start by washing the raisins and currants. Weld them in hot water for about 30 minutes. In your mixer bowl you combine the flour with the sugar and salt. Wash the lemon and get the zest. Make sure you only use the yellow skin; the white pith underneath is very bitter. Melt the butter, add the milk and nuke it for another 10 to 15 seconds until everything’s luke-warm. Whisk well. You can also use a pan, of course. Add the instant yeast, cinnamon and lemon zest and mix it all up.

    Add the egg to the flour, mix it in and slowly pour in the club soda. Finally, you whisk in the butter and yeast mix. Dab the raisins/currants dry and peel and finely chop the apple. You should end up with roughly 3 oz apple. Fold it into the batter. Cover the bowl with a damp cloth and store it in an draft-free place for an hour to an hour and a half.

    Once the dough has risen you heat the sunflower or peanut oil (I used my deep-fryer) and stir the batter with a wooden spoon for a few minutes while letting the oil come to temperature. The oil should be exactly 180Cº (355Fº). Use a large ice-scoop and dip it into the hot oil for a second or so before grabbing a spoonful of batter. Level the spoon against the side of the bowl. Drop the batter into the hot oil and give them 3 minutes on each side. Use a fork to flip them over.

    Line a colander with paper towels to store the oliebollen while you continue to bake. Generously sprinkle them with confections sugar right before serving them. Oliebollen can be eaten warm, luke-warm or even cold, but I think they’re best when they’re luke-warm. Instead of using your microwave to reheat them, it’s best to just give a bowl filled with oliebollen 15 to 20 minutes in an oven at 100Cº (210Fº).

Meal type: Pastry, Partyfood, New Years, Dutch Food
Servings: 18
Copyright: © kayotickitchen.com

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    13 Comments »

    1. 1

      Mmmmm Oliebollen. I have a love/hate relationshil with them.We got married on the 30th of December and except for that first year, I always ended up spending that day in sheds or garages, freezing to death while baking the tempting little balls and some appelflappen.Since moving to Canada in 1988, nothing changed.First it was about keeping Dutch traditions alive for our 2 yong boys.Now it is about giving it on to the grandkids.Happy New Year! I’ll now run to the kitchen and take your recipe. The one in my ancient (38years on the day) Dutch cookbook will be retired   today! Thanks! 
       
       

      Evelyn on Dec 30, 2013 @ 4:42 pm Reply
      1. I still remember my mom baking them in the kitchen but putting all windows open against each other leaving the house freezing cold and you could still smell it. I used to hate that smell as it lingered around the house for days :)

        Now that she passed away I like the smell that deep-frying oliebollen gives because it reminds me of my childhood and my mom.

        Kay on Dec 30, 2013 @ 5:19 pm Reply
    2. 2

      Thanks for sharing. It wouldn’t be New Year’s Day without theses delightful treats.  I am always amazed at all the different variations for Ollie Bollen.   My favorites are with the Citroen or glazed/candied fruit. 
       

      Carrie on Dec 30, 2013 @ 4:58 pm Reply
    3. 3

      Ik heb ze vandaag gebakken en ze zijn heerlijk! Thanx for sharing your recipe. I  did use bread flour.

      Alie on Dec 31, 2013 @ 9:45 pm Reply
    4. 4

      Thank you for the recipe!  I made these for my Dutch husband and he was ecstatic.  He said the smell reminded him of New Year’s when he was a boy.  He also said they tasted perfect just like he remembered.

      Anne Van de Kamp on Jan 1, 2014 @ 6:21 pm Reply
    5. 5

      Oh my goodness I was so happy to see this recipe. My husband was born in Canada but his Grandma is from Holland. She passed away years ago so I never had a chance to meet her. Every year around the holidays my husband talks about her Oliebollens and how delicious they were. i can not wait to try this recipe! Thank you so much for sharing!

      Reeza on Jan 1, 2014 @ 9:44 pm Reply
    6. 6

      Can you add the optional candied fruit ingredients for those of us that don’t speak Dutch and would prefer to try the recipe as written?

      Brenda on Jan 2, 2014 @ 6:50 am Reply
      1. Just add 2 to 3 oz candied fruit along with the raisins is all.

        Kay on Jan 2, 2014 @ 7:47 am Reply
    7. 7

      I’ve been wanting to make oliebollen but never dared…something about deep frying always makes me skittish.  I may have to brave it though.  I’m feeling nostalgic for my mothers oliebollen and she lives too far away!! 
      Now, about that recipe for appelflapen…

      Nancy on Jan 5, 2014 @ 7:10 am Reply
    8. 8

      My mother-in-law makes these every year for the new year.  They are one of the traditional Dutch foods I truly enjoy.  Well, I love  komijnekaas, regular young Gouda, and frikendel, kaas souffle…, OK, I might like more than I let on.  One exception: kroket.  I just cannot get behind those and my sweet husband loves them more than life.  Biterballen doesn’t do it for me either.  I believe these are just a rounder version of the other.  I think this is textural.  Anyway, I have tried making these and they just didn’t work out right.  I’d ask my mother-in-law to show me, but truth be told hers aren’t as good as the ones in Holland either.  Do you have a recipe you’d be willing to share ? A demo might be what I need to surprise my hubs with a treat from his homeland.  
      Thanks and I am loving your blog and site.  I stumbled across it today as I was searching for methods of freezing ginger.  
      Danke you well (said the corny American),
      Stephanie

      Stephanie Poldervaart on Mar 8, 2014 @ 5:32 pm Reply
      1. You’re right, bitterballen are just a smaller and rounder portion than kroketten! I’m very fussy about them as well, they’ have to be perfect.
        I’ve yet to do an official kroketten recipe but been planning several for some time now. I do have a recipe for vegetable bitterballen in my blog that’s really tasty!

        Kay on Mar 8, 2014 @ 6:18 pm Reply
    9. 9

      I am eager to see your recipe when you are ready to share.  I’ll keep an eye out! 
      I went ahead and started the bitterballen last night.  I was pouring over your site and my husband asked me was so interesting.  The jig is up now, so no surprise  biterballen, but biterballen nonetheless.  
      He was pretty adamant about meat, so I went ahead and cooked some beef and pork in my pressure cooker to add to the mix.  I was too busy to roll and fry last night, so will fix these tomorrow.  even I, the gooey gravy skeptic, must admit the meat mixture was tasty.  If I can pull off the breading and frying I think I will have a winner.  
      I’ll allowed, I’ll share a picture if all goes well.  Thanks, too, for your reply and for the recipe.  It’s great to have a resource of recipes from a Dutch girl herself.  

      Stephanie Poldervaart on Mar 9, 2014 @ 4:08 pm Reply
    10. 10

      LEKKER LEKKER….lived in The Netherlands for a year to be near my family! LOVED the Ollie Bollen kiosks on the streets where you can purchase warm treats with powdered sugar. DELICIOUS

      Jim Yatman on Apr 1, 2014 @ 5:11 pm Reply

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