May 10, 2010

Honey and Mustard Bread

This is probably one of the more peculiar combination of flavors I ever put inside a bread. I think the recipe was printed in a book that came with the bread machine I used for a little while, about 5 years ago now. I vaguely remembered it and just tried to recreate it, adding things as I went.

I dumped the bread machine 6 months after I bought it—it really wasn’t my thing. I couldn’t handle all the loaves of bread with paddle holes smack-dab in the middle. It was too much for the perfectionist in me. That, and somehow I could never get the crust quite right.

Now that I’ve been using the new stand mixer—much to the delight of the men in my life—I totally reinstated the bread-baking thing. Because face it, what could be more homey and yummy than having the house smell like fresh-baked bread?

 

Ingredients:

3 1/2 cups flour
1 cup luke-warm milk
1/2 cup warm water
2.5 tsp instant yeast (3 tsp active dry yeast)
1 tsp salt 
2 tsp dried thyme
1/4 cup honey 
3 tbsp coarse mustard 
3 tbsp olive oil 
 

Directions:

The chosen ones.
Honey and Mustard Bread

We’ll also be needing flour. I opted for organic flour. Can’t say I tasted a difference.
Honey and Mustard Bread

You’ll also need to keep a cup of luke-warm milk nearby.
Honey and Mustard Bread

I decided to let my mixer do the work and combined the yeast with 1/2 a cup warm water. Warm, not hot. Mix it on low for 4 minutes.
Honey and Mustard Bread

Pour in the oil. Add the salt, thyme, mustard and honey. This will smell really strong! If you only want a hint of mustard add 2 tbsp instead of 3, I prefer 3. Keep the machine on low-speed while you add your ingredients.
Honey and Mustard Bread

Pour in the milk.
Honey and Mustard Bread

Add the flour, 1/2 a cup at a time, until your wet and dry ingredients are combined. At this point the dough will look like a sticky, rough-looking mass. Turn off the machine, put a towel over the bowl and let the dough sit for 15 minutes. This will give the liquids a chance to be absorbed.
Honey and Mustard Bread

Most people make the mistake of using too much flour. When they see the really sticky dough you start out with they tend to add more flour, when in reality the gluten still have to be developed. This process takes place during the kneading.

After 15 minutes you start kneading. I gave mine 8 minutes at high speed. As soon as you’ve kneaded for several minutes you’ll see the sticky mess turn into a supple dough and eventually it balls up. If yours still looks impossibly sticky in the last few minutes, add a tbsp flour at a time until it balls up.
Honey and Mustard Bread

This is what my dough looked like after 8 minutes. Still quite sticky to the touch, but workable. Cover the bowl and let the dough rest for 10 minutes.
Honey and Mustard Bread

Let the dough rise for an hour or so when using active dry yeast, punch it down and then proceed with the recipe below.

I’m baking the bread in my Dutch oven. Lightly oiling it first.
Honey and Mustard Bread

Sprinkle flour on top of your kitchen counter and flour your hands, this should be enough to get rid of the stickiness. Make sure that, all together, you use no more than 1/2 a cup of flour on the counter and your hands. Preferably less. Shape the dough, place it in the Dutch oven and sprinkle a little flour on top. Cover the bowl and let it rise for an hour and a half. Until doubled in size.
Honey and Mustard Bread

Bake the bread in a preheated oven at 350F (175C) for roughly 40 minutes. Until golden brown and sounding hollow when tapped.
Honey and Mustard Bread

Remove it from the Dutch oven and let it cool off completely before slicing it. This one turned out great. I love this combination of flavors.
Honey and Mustard Bread

This bread just screams goodness and home to me. It’s so incredibly tasty and makes for a mean ham, turkey or chicken sandwich. Just spread a thin layer of (real) butter or Hellmann’s and top with crispy lettuce, good-quality ham, turkey or deli chicken, tomatoes and cucumber.
Honey and Mustard Bread

Honey and Mustard Bread
Ingredients
  • 3 1/2 cups flour
    1 cup luke-warm milk
    1/2 cup warm water
    2.5 tsp instant yeast (3 tsp active dry yeast)
    1 tsp salt
    2 tsp dried thyme
    1/4 cup honey
    3 tbsp coarse mustard
    3 tbsp olive oil
Directions
  1. Combine the yeast with 1/2 a cup warm water. Warm, not hot or you’ll kill the yeast. Transfer it to to your mixer bowl, add the oil, salt, thyme, mustard and honey. keep the machien on low-speed while you add your ingredients. Pour in the milk and add the flour, 1/2 a cup at a time, until your wet and dry ingredients are combined. At this point the dough will look like a sticky, rough-looking mass. Turn off the machine, put a towel over the bowl and let the dough sit for 15 minutes. This will give the liquids a chance to be absorbed.

    After 15 minutes you start kneading. I gave mine 8 minutes at high speed. As soon as you’ve kneaded for several minutes you’ll see the sticky mess turn into a supple dough and eventually it balls up. If yours still looks impossibly sticky in the last few minutes, add a tbsp flour at a time until it balls up. Cover the bowl and let the dough rest for 10 minutes when using instant yeast, or 1 hour when using active dry yeast.

    Lightly oil a Dutch oven. Sprinkle flour on top of your kitchen counter and flour your hands, this should be enough to get rid of the stickiness. Make sure that, all together, you use no more than 1/2 a cup of flour on the counter and your hands. Preferably less. Shape the dough, place it in the Dutch oven and sprinkle a little flour on top. Cover the bowl and let it rise for an hour and a half. Until doubled in size. Bake the bread in a preheated oven at 350F (175C) for roughly 40 minutes. Until golden brown and sounding hollow when tapped. Remove it from the Dutch oven and let it cool off completely before slicing it.
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    24 Comments »

    1. 1

      Oh my word! Wow. The bread has such a lovely crumb b/c of the moist dough. I’m bookmarking this recipe. Thank you, Kay!

      Memoria on May 10, 2010 @ 8:22 am Reply
    2. 2

      This looks fantastic! Great shots too.

      Lori on May 10, 2010 @ 11:08 am Reply
    3. 3

      Whoa, I’d love to sink my teeth into that sandwich right about NOW! Looks so tasty.

      Maria on May 10, 2010 @ 11:21 am Reply
    4. 4

      So glad to have found your blog. Everything looks delicious and the photos are really great.

      Amber on May 10, 2010 @ 3:44 pm Reply
    5. 5

      I came here via foodgawker and this looked just so amazing. You are talented!!

      Luna on May 10, 2010 @ 4:15 pm Reply
    6. 6

      What a combination! I really like the idea of using different flavors in the bread dough. Makes the loaf so much more interesting. Thanks so much for sharing this great recipe, Kay.

      Lana from Never Enough Thyme on May 10, 2010 @ 4:21 pm Reply
    7. 7

      This looks delicious!  Do you bake the bread with the cover on or off?

      denise on May 10, 2010 @ 4:27 pm Reply
    8. 8

      @Denise:

      I baked mine uncovered.

      Kay on May 10, 2010 @ 4:33 pm Reply
    9. 9

      My initial thought was: this looks like a very middle of the road sandwich! Sorry…I stand corrected! Homemade bread wow yummy fantastic. Sounds delightful- I can almost smell it!
      I never did buy a bread maker. I’m not all that into machines. I’m glad you are getting such a lot of pleasure from your new toy. I have of late been thinking about getting a food processor. I had one years ago but never used it. (I gave it away) Now I think it’s time to go for a Magimix or a Kitchenaid (I’m not getting any younger and could use a bit of help!) and may as well go for the best! I just wonder if I will use it. It does do everything but will it be a hassle I wonder. Perhaps I, like you should go for a mixer- it seems to do an awful lot. At the moment I just have a stick blender and a very simple hand mixer.

      Vanessa on May 10, 2010 @ 8:38 pm Reply
    10. 10

      @Vanessa:

      The bread maker was such a waste of money to me. Clumsy to use. I have a Kenwood food processor that does it all, too. Well, it doesn’t knead dough, but anything else it does. I wore it out, so I’m actually contemplating a Magimix as well! I have to say I’m very, very attached to my cheap stick blender and do almost everything with it.

      Kay on May 10, 2010 @ 8:45 pm Reply
    11. 11

      Peculiar or not, this would make wonderful sandwich bread!

      Cookin' Canuck on May 10, 2010 @ 9:54 pm Reply
    12. 12

      This looks SOOOOO good!

      Suzy on May 11, 2010 @ 8:33 am Reply
    13. 13

      This tastes  SOOOOO good!:) I’ve just found this blog and I think I will stay here  for longer:)

      Martyna on May 11, 2010 @ 9:48 pm Reply
    14. 14

      Just saw your beautiful pics and had to bake your bread two hours later. I enjoyed it for the last two days, delicious!

      Verena on May 12, 2010 @ 9:23 pm Reply
    15. 15

      @Verena:

      Did your bread also taste even better the next day? I made curried chicken salad sandwiches with it the following day and it was sooooo good.

      Kay on May 14, 2010 @ 7:45 am Reply
    16. 16

      I love making bread in my Dutch oven too! It’s so easy and practical and they do come out perfect.
      Magda

      my little expat kitchen on May 14, 2010 @ 2:05 pm Reply
    17. 17

      I made it. It taste great.
      I have question. How big cup do you use? 236 ml or 250 ml?
      My dough at first was very loose,  maybe I mixed up something during adding ingredients, but I don’t think so. I added about half cup of flour more and it started looking similar to dough from your pictures.

      Wiosanna on May 14, 2010 @ 2:09 pm Reply
    18. 18

      @Wiosanna:

      I used 250ml cups. But with me it turns out different often as well, sometimes these amounts are perfect, other times I’ll use a different flour and have to add 1 or 2 tbsp flour in the final few minutes as well. That’s the fun part of making your own bread :)

      Kay on May 14, 2010 @ 2:14 pm Reply
    19. 19

      So that’s the reason why it was so loose! I’ve got used that most recipes in English use American cups, in milk and water difference was a little but in flour it’s 150 g of flour more :)
      Thank you.

      Wiosanna on May 14, 2010 @ 2:23 pm Reply
    20. 20

      Shame you don’t use weight when you do bread.   It works so much better and more consistently as well.  When people make bread from a recipe, then it is just luck whether they will get the flour right since it all depends on how you measure it.  The differences between the dip and level off and the add it from a spoon can be 20-30 g of flour and that makes a big difference in the bread.

      dick on May 16, 2010 @ 8:10 pm Reply
    21. 21

      Hi Kay! I tried your recipe last night, and I must say….oh, boy! It was absolutely delicious! Only instead of dry I put some fresh thyme (yup, straight from the flowerpot). The dough turned out so sticky and loose, it was just impossible to shape. I just placed it (more presicely “poured” it) on a baking pan, hoping that it would be baked into something that looks and tastes like bread. And it did!!! I was fantastic! Kudos!

      A on May 21, 2010 @ 2:29 pm Reply
    22. 22

      (I guess I should have added more flour. I think that I used a small cup, maybe a 150ml, not sure though :D) 

      A on May 21, 2010 @ 2:32 pm Reply
    23. 23

      This sounds delicious.  I really love mustard so I’ll have to take a swing at this one.  I’m curious though what the difference is between baking bread in a dutch oven vs. loaf pan.  Did you bake it with the lid on?  I’ve read other bread recipes recently which state to bake with the loaf on for the first half or so and then remove the lid to finish.  Do you happen to know what is the point of doing that?  Thanks!

      Jessica on Dec 9, 2012 @ 9:47 pm Reply
      1. Sorry, meant “with the lid on” not “with the loaf on”

        Jessica on Dec 9, 2012 @ 9:48 pm Reply

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