Jan 11, 2010

German Potato Salad

German Potato Salad 



One thing I’ve always been jealous of are potlucks. Maybe jealous isn’t the right word; I’m simply in awe of the concept.

We don’t have something like that here. The idea of eating with a big group of family or friends, and each person in the group bringing a special dish to be shared among the group, it just sounds like fun. Might even have to set up something like that in our neighborhood. Imagine a gigantic potluck with signature dishes from all over the world, since the neighborhood I live in is a melting pot of cultures. Would be amazing. Food unites, or maybe it doesn’t but it sure sounds good. 

My grandmother on my father’s side was German. So, I guess that makes me 1/4th German, though you’d never tell if you’d hear me stammer and stutter when trying to speak German. Maybe that’s why I’ve always been slightly partial to the sour German potato salads, and especially this one, seeing as I grew up with it. It’s simple and delicious. You’ll whip it up in almost no time, and it’s a major crowd pleaser to boot.  

Here’s my contribution to your next potluck. Think of me when you bring it! 





Ingredients: 

1 1/2 pounds potatoes
2 vegetable bouillon cubes
1/2 a tsp salt
1 medium onion
flat-leaf parsley
1/4 cup white wine vinegar
2 tbsp sugar
4 tbsp mayonnaise
1 tbsp yogurt
1/2 tsp sugar
1/8 tsp garlic salt
pepper



Directions: 

Peel, wash and slice your potatoes in 1/4 inch slices. Cut the slices in half again. 

German Potato Salad 



Add 2 vegetable bouillon cubes, 1/2 a tsp salt and pour in water until your potato slices are fully submerged. 

German Potato Salad 



Finely mince 1 medium or 1/2 a large onion. 

German Potato Salad 



Wash, dry and finely chop a good handful of flat-leaf parsley. You can also go for chives, or even dried herbs. Whatever rocks your boat. 

German Potato Salad 



Another major ingredient is white wine vinegar. Now, with me being a (partially German) hardcore foodie and all, I’m going for a full 1/4 cup of vinegar. However, if you’re a bit of a wuss, feel free to tone it down and use half the amount I’m using. Of course I’ll mock you, that goes without saying. 

German Potato Salad 



Bring the potatoes to a boil and cook them for 3 minutes straight. Stick to the timeline I give you or really bad things will happen to your taters. It won’t be pretty.

German Potato Salad 



Add the minced onions, pour in the white wine vinegar and add 2 tbsp sugar. Boil the potatoes for yet another 3 minutes. No longer. 

German Potato Salad 


Turn off the heat and let the potatoes sit in the hot water for 10 minutes while you move on with the recipe. 



Combine 4 tbsp mayonnaise with 1 tbsp yogurt, 1/2 a tsp sugar, pepper to taste and 1/8 tsp garlic salt. Hellmann’s is slightly saltier than our Dutch mayonnaise, so taste it to see if it needs more salt. Stir to combine. 

German Potato Salad 



And stir in the parsley. Or chives. Or whatever you decided to use. 

German Potato Salad 



Drain the potatoes slices well. 

German Potato Salad 



Stir in your mayo mix. The potatoes should become slightly mashed with lots of coarse pieces. That’s pretty much the structure you’re looking for. 

German Potato Salad 



This is so good and what’s even better; it can be eaten all year ‘round. You eat them cold or at room temperature—I prefer them at room temp—but they are absolutely to die for when eaten alongside a nice, juicy grilled Entrecote and some added vegetables. 

German Potato Salad



Kay’s Recipe Card

Click here for printable size.

German Potato Salad
Ingredients
  • 1 1/2 pounds potatoes
    2 vegetable bouillon cubes
    1/2 a tsp salt
    1 medium onion
    flat-leaf parsley
    1/4 cup white wine vinegar
    2 tbsp sugar
    4 tbsp mayonnaise
    1 tbsp yogurt
    1/2 tsp sugar
    1/8 tsp garlic salt
    pepper
Directions
  1. Peel, wash and slice your potatoes in 1/4 inch slices. Cut the slices in half again. Add 2 vegetable bouillon cubes, 1/2 a tsp salt and pour in water until your potato slices are fully submerged.

    Finely mince 1 medium or 1/2 a large onion. Wash, dry and finely chop a good handful of flat-leaf parsley. You can also go for chives, or even dried herbs. Bring the potatoes to a boil and cook them for 3 minutes straight. Add the minced onions, pour in the white wine vinegar and add 2 tbsp sugar. Boil the potatoes for yet another 3 minutes. No longer. Turn off the heat and let the potatoes sit in the hot water for 10 minutes while you move on with the recipe.

    Combine 4 tbsp mayonnaise with 1 tbsp yogurt, 1/2 a tsp sugar, pepper to taste and 1/8 tsp garlic salt and the flat-leaf parsley. Hellmann’s is slightly saltier than our Dutch mayonnaise, so taste it to see if it needs more salt. Stir to combine. Drain the potatoes slices well and add the mayo mi, the potatoes should become slightly mashed with lots of coarse pieces.

    Serve the salad cold or at room temperature.
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    38 Comments »

    1. 1

      Why don’t you start up a potluck?! You could get together with your friends and neighbors and tell them to bring their own dishes. That would be great!

      Your German Potato Salad looks delicious. I always enjoy looking at your photos.

      Memoria on Jan 11, 2010 @ 10:13 am Reply
      1. @memoria:

        As soon as the weather picks up, I definitely think I will. In the Netherlands neighbors are usually pretty close and will often drink coffee at each others houses several times a week. But this sounds like a wonderful way to get to know everyone in a really relaxed setting.

        Kay on Jan 11, 2010 @ 10:17 am Reply
    2. 2

      Your potato salad looks so yummy, chic and pretty.

      Christina on Jan 11, 2010 @ 10:52 am Reply
    3. 3

      Hope you had a great weekend, Kay!.

      Looks great and your photos are so hauntingly beautiful! This recipe vaguely reminds me of my mother’s potato salad. I will have to give yours a try!

      Stacy on Jan 11, 2010 @ 11:10 am Reply
    4. 4

      Looks yummy, thanks kay!

      PeachRainbow on Jan 11, 2010 @ 11:53 am Reply
    5. 5

      Yum! This looks fabulous! By the way, I was in Gouda on Saturday. What a cute village! Everyone was skating on the frozen canals, and I stopped by De Rode Leeuw…so cute! I got some whole wheat flour…can’t wait to make something with it!

      Lizzy on Jan 11, 2010 @ 1:42 pm Reply
    6. 6

      My mom’s potato salad is very similair to yours. She cubes the potatoes instead tho.

      Potlucks. I am looking forward to hearing about how yours turns out when you have one someday.

      Kath on Jan 11, 2010 @ 3:52 pm Reply
    7. 7

      My moms salad has bacon in it and the bacon grease is used for the dressing with sugar and vinegar, but I will try this one soon

      sue on Jan 11, 2010 @ 5:52 pm Reply
      1. @Sue:

        That’s actually the method I use for a warm German potato salad!

        Kay on Jan 11, 2010 @ 7:46 pm Reply
    8. 8

      I LOVE vinegary potato salads. One of my roommates makes the best Russian potato salad I’ve ever had; it is something I dream about.

      Katie on Jan 11, 2010 @ 6:05 pm Reply
    9. 9

      You MUST start a potluck!! Most of our potlucks take place at church. We have game night once a month where we play a domino game called 88, chicken foot, and Mexican train. Everyone brings a dish. Sometimes we have 50 people there, so there is a great variety of food. We also have a Soup and Salad luncheon every couple of months. The church provides the soup and the guests brings salads and desserts. This is great fun, too.

      Jancd on Jan 11, 2010 @ 8:47 pm Reply
    10. 10

      So……have a potluck!
      By definition it isn’t hard at all.
      The first time, it might be easier to assign “dessert” to one or two people, “maindish” to another, “soup” to another, just to kind of get people rolling.
      Why can’t you be the one to bring the phenomenon to Gouda?

      Kat on Jan 11, 2010 @ 10:42 pm Reply
    11. 11

      Pot Lucks are so popular here because it lessens the work load and they are especially popular at office parties or church things. I’ll make this as soon as I get some more yogurt!

      Lindie on Jan 12, 2010 @ 1:41 am Reply
    12. 12

      My husband’s family comes from Germany as well and they love German food! This dish looks perfect for a potluck and will probably disappear as soon as I put it down on a table. :)

      Sook on Jan 12, 2010 @ 2:10 am Reply
    13. 13

      Hi Kay,
      I’m German and love your blog and your great ideas on food.
      But… no one making a potato salad in Germany would ever use your approach on cooking the potatoes.
      You’re supposed to boil the potatoes in whole and then rinse them and let them cool off before peeling them and cutting them in the right-sized pieces.
      The reason for cooking them whole is that they don’t get too mushy and keep their consistency and also the ability to soak the dressing.
      That’s also a reason for preparing a potato salad early before a meal, so that the potatoes can soak in and take on the taste of the dressing, and you get a chance to flavour a little more if needed.

      Just my two cents on making a good potato salad.
      Cheers, S.

      Sandra on Jan 12, 2010 @ 5:01 pm Reply
      1. @Sandra:

        I’m Dutch, and I probably make ‘Dutch meatballs’ very differently than my neighbor does, who is every bit as Dutch as I am. Same goes for splitpea soup, boterkoek and probably 50 other typically Dutch dishes. In short; there is no one standard recipe or method for an entire nation, each family has its own unique recipes, that’s the fun part about cooking. This is how my German grandmother made them, then my mother and now me. So to me… this is a typical German potato salad.

        Kay on Jan 12, 2010 @ 5:09 pm Reply
    14. 14

      WOW! Way to go Kay! I made these this morning and I must say they are deeelissshhh! But, then again, everything I make from this site is great!

      mirinblue on Jan 12, 2010 @ 6:23 pm Reply
    15. 15

      Kay,
      I was thinking when I read Sandra’s comment also that I too am German, and my Grandma’s recipe was totally different. She used bacon in hers and it was chunkier. I’m sure different regions of Germany make things differently or people just adapted to their own liking. This looks fabulous!

      DishinAndDishes on Jan 12, 2010 @ 6:27 pm Reply
      1. @DishinAndDishes:

        I think so, too. It would be kind of akward for an entire nation to make the exact same salad. Usually they’re family recipes.

        I make my warm german potato salad with bacon! It’s so good. We add hardboiled eggs and mustard to it as well, but I’ve eaten so many different variations in German restaurants :)

        Kay on Jan 12, 2010 @ 6:32 pm Reply
    16. 16

      Thanks Kay for the wonderful recipe, your pictures are amazing also. It looks like the perfect potato salad. Yes, potlucks are common in the states. I like your idea of a neighborhood potluck, please be sure to invite me, I’m only a few thousand miles away….

      Brad on Jan 12, 2010 @ 6:50 pm Reply
    17. 17

      It has to be regional, since this is how my German father makes his Kartoffelsalat as well. He adds gherkins tho.

      So glad to have found your site!

      Rita on Jan 12, 2010 @ 8:27 pm Reply
    18. 18

      Gosh this looks good. I do love the sour-ness of German-style potato salads, and I like the way yours is slightly mashed. I make one based on a Richard Corrigan recipe. You simmer the onions in apple cider vinegar and then mix these through cooked potatoes, with some mustard and fresh herbs. It’s really good.

      kathryn on Jan 13, 2010 @ 1:58 am Reply
      1. @kathryn:

        That sounds really, really good. Have to see if I can find apple cider vinegar here.

        Kay on Jan 13, 2010 @ 8:47 am Reply
    19. 19

      I just found your blog today whilst I was looking for a stoofvlees recipe (a Belgian friend mentioned it). I’ve looked through a number of recipes and I can’t wait to try some of them! Your writing style and your beautiful pictures make everything look fun and easy. I’m going to make this potato salad the next time /I/ go to a potluck!

      Kelley on Jan 14, 2010 @ 12:04 am Reply
    20. 20

      goes great with schnitzel or saussages.

      tobias cooks! on Jan 14, 2010 @ 12:11 am Reply
    21. 21

      I have tried out many of your delicious recipes. I think there are as many German potato salads as there are Grandparents. I’ve never heard of this kind of potato preparation, but will try it out. am a German (currently living in the US) andThe US potatoes never behave how I want them to (they seem to be destined to become mashed potatoes), and maybe this will work. The short cooking time is tempting. My grandmother from Berlin always added raw chopped onions, fresh apples and pickles to the potatoes, and used oil, some pickling brine and vinegar for the dressing.
      P.S. My sister is currently studying Dutch, and I almost think I am able to read it.

      Mona on Jan 15, 2010 @ 11:24 pm Reply
    22. 22

      Mona – try New or Red Potatoes in the U.S. They hold up much better than russet.

      DishinAndDishes on Jan 15, 2010 @ 11:27 pm Reply
    23. 23

      DishinAndDishes – Thank you for the recommendation, I usually use the Red Potatoes and they do hold up better, but the ones that the supermarket here sells are always a bit old. Maybe I am just too picky :-)

      Mona on Jan 16, 2010 @ 2:36 am Reply
    24. 24

      Kay,
      The salad is the best! I love German potato salad and have made it by myself too (whole boiled with pickles and eggs), but never never never could get SO wonderful taste.
      I just made the salad and now waiting for the family – i will serve it with grilled salmon fillet and some lettuce.

      By the way – do you have some salmon recipe?

      Diana on Jan 20, 2010 @ 8:36 pm Reply
      1. @Diana:

        Don’t you just love it?

        I don’t have a salmon recipe, it’s the only kind of fish my guys don’t care for at all, so I rarely make it. But I do know that Kalyn (over at http://kalynskitchen.blogspot.com/) has some wicked salmon recipes!

        Kay on Jan 20, 2010 @ 8:39 pm Reply
    25. 25

      Oh, Kay, thank you so very much from all my family! My guys were happy, son just tried it and said – mom, I´ll want more:))
      I´m really happy to try your wonderful recipes.
      Thanks for the link, I´ll check Kalyn´s salmon.

      Diana on Jan 21, 2010 @ 12:33 am Reply

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