Dec 4, 2014

Creamy Chicory Mash Pot

Creamy Chicory Mash

This recipe is derived from an old Dutch recipe for ‘Friese stamppot’. Friesland is a province in the northwest of the Netherlands.

Traditionally you make the potato & vegetable mash, put it in an oven dish, sprinkle cheese on top and place it under a hot broiler. I never do that. I just mash it and call it a day. I like being rebellious like that and, oh well, Friesland is a long way from here. What are they gonna do?

Chicory also goes by the name Belgian endive, God knows why because they call it witloof (dubbel 0) there. If you’re in the Netherlands you’ll call it witlof (one o). Whatever you want to call it, and now you know you have options, this baby will be one of our (many) Christmas side dishes this year.

This mash rocks our worlds! The kiddo loves it, and really, what’s not to love? It’s creamy (not very low-fat), easy to make, flavourful and it just hits all the right spots!

This side-dish can be served with pretty much anything from fish to meat or poultry.

 

Ingredients:

2 pounds potatoes
1 1/2 pounds chicory/Belgian endive
2 tbsp butter
1/3 cup/80ml water
4 tbsp creme fraiche
1 vegetable bouillon cube
1/2 tbsp grainy mustard
1/8 tsp ground nutmeg
handful grated cheese (mine’s always aged Gouda)
salt & pepper

 

Directions:

Peel and wash your potatoes. Cover them with plenty (lightly) salted water and boil them for 20 to 25 minutes, until fork-tender.
Creamy Chicory Mash

Chicory isn’t nearly as bitter as it used to be. It’s actually a pretty mellow vegetable these days. Remove any unpretty outer leaves.
Creamy Chicory Mash

Cut the chicory in half. If you’re determined to cut out the bitter part; that triangle near my finger is the evil part that needs to go.
Creamy Chicory Mash

Cut the halves in half again lengthwise and turn them into slightly larger but still manageable pieces.
Creamy Chicory Mash

As soon as your taters are boiling, start cooking the chicory.
Creamy Chicory Mash

Heat the butter and sauté the chicory for 3 to 4 minutes. Want to add a little sweetness to the dish, just add a few tiny pieces apple. It’s delicious as well.
Creamy Chicory Mash

Add the water and crumble in the bouillon cube. Put the lid on and smother the chicory over low heat for 10 to 15 minutes, it will release quite some liquid! Keep an eye on it because we don’t want it to end up mushy. That’s gross. No-one likes mushy vegetables.
Creamy Chicory Mash

As soon as the chicory is fork-tender but still has a bite, you stir in the creme fraiche, mustard and nutmeg.
Creamy Chicory Mash

Drain the potatoes, steam-dry them for a few minutes and mash them. Use a slotted spoon to transfer the chicory and stir it into the potatoes. Check if needs more salt and adjust when needed.
Creamy Chicory Mash

Use the creamy cooking liquid to smoothen the puree. Stir in the grated cheese, add black pepper to taste and you’re done.
Creamy Chicory Mash

This is such a laid-back dish! Can also be prepared in advance.
Creamy Chicory Mash

 

Creamy Chicory Mash Pot
Ingredients
    2 pounds potatoes
    1 1/2 pound chicory/Belgian endive
    2 tbsp butter
    1/3 cup/80ml water
    4 tbsp creme fraiche
    1 vegetable bouillon cube
    1/2 tbsp grainy mustard
    1/8 tsp ground nutmeg
    handful grated cheese (mine’s always aged Gouda)
    salt & pepper

Directions
    Peel and wash your potatoes. Cover them with plenty (lightly) salted water and boil them for 20 to 25 minutes, until fork-tender. Cut the chicory in half. Cut the halves in half again lengthwise and turn them into slightly larger but still manageable pieces. As soon as your potatoes are boiling you start working on the chicory.

    Heat the butter in a big pan with tight-fitting lid. Heat the butter and sauté the chicory for 3 to 4 minutes. Want to add a little sweetness to the dish, just add a few tiny pieces apple. Add the water and crumble in the bouillon cube. Put the lid on and smother the chicory over low heat for 10 to 15 minutes. Keep an eye on it, we don’t want it to be mushy.

    As soon as the chicory is fork-tender but still has a bite, you stir in the creme fraiche, mustard and nutmeg. Drain the potatoes, steam-dry them for a few minutes and mash them. Use a slotted spoon to transfer the chicory and stir it into the potatoes. Check if needs more salt and adjust when needed. Use the creamy cooking liquid to smoothen the puree. Stir in the grated cheese, add black pepper to taste and you’re done.

    You can make this dish in advance. I sometimes even make it a day ahead.

Meal type: Side-dish, vegetarian
Servings: 4
Copyright: © kayotickitchen.com

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    7 Comments »

    1. 1

      The popular story goes that chicory was discovered accidentally in 1830 during the Belgian Revolution in the Netherlands, near Brussels by the farmer Jan Lammers in Schaerbeek. I think, that is the reason, there is often Belgium in the naming of recipes. History.
      However, I did not know this is called “Friese stamppot”, and I do live close to Friesland. Learned something today

      Ageeth on Dec 5, 2014 @ 8:48 am Reply
    2. 2

      Try Belgian endive really simple.Roast it in the oven brushed with olive oil,sea salt and lotsa pepper.yummmmm

      Jack on Dec 6, 2014 @ 2:49 am Reply
    3. 3

      P.S.I never peel potatoes,much more flavor and chew factor.

      Jack on Dec 6, 2014 @ 2:51 am Reply
    4. 4

      This sounds so, so delicious! I just wish endive wasn’t so expensive here.

      Lana | NevrEnoughThyme on Dec 8, 2014 @ 2:53 pm Reply
      1. Is it so expensive there? For me it’s about $2 per pound or so.

        Kay on Dec 8, 2014 @ 3:28 pm Reply
        1. I stopped buying it about a year or so ago because it had become so expensive. As I recall, it was about $5 per pound at that time. I should take another look next time I’m shopping :-)

          Lana | NevrEnoughThyme on Dec 8, 2014 @ 5:16 pm Reply
    5. 5

      Last I checked it was around 39 cents a pound here

      Jack on Dec 11, 2014 @ 10:37 pm Reply

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