Sep 8, 2011

Chicken & Onion Tagine

Chicken & Onion Tagine

The Kefta Mkouara wasn’t all I cooked in the tagine this week. I still had a few chicken breasts that needed to be used up. Now one of my favorite foods is curried chicken, so I knew I would add a fair amount of curry powder for starters and take it from there.

Then it dawned on me: I had to try to combine the chicken with a more low-key version of my mezgaldi! So I added the onions, some garlic, a handful of raisins for a hint of sweetness and a few warm spices and let it all simmer into a loose, luscious sauce.

Both my guys devoured this and I was extremely charmed of it as well, to say the least. This one’s a definite do again.

 
Ingredients:

1 1/2 pound chicken fillet
3 medium to large onions
2/3 tbsp curry powder
1/8 tsp cayenne
1/4 to 1/2 tsp black pepper
1/4 tsp cinnamon (slightly heaping)
1 garlic clove
1 tbsp flour
1/2 tsp salt + a pinch extra
1/4 cup raisins
2/3 tbsp curry powder
2 to 3 tbsp sunflower oil
2/3 cup chicken stock

 

Directions:

Mix the 1st 2/3 tbsp curry powder with the flour, black pepper and salt.
Chicken & Onion Tagine

Cut each chicken breast into 3 or 4 large pieces and sprinkle the seasoning all over.
Chicken & Onion Tagine

For blogging purposes, I had to know exactly how much my onions weighed. Nearly a pound.
Chicken & Onion Tagine

Cut them in thick slices, grate the garlic and get the raisins ready for some action.
Chicken & Onion Tagine

 
I slowly heated my tagine. Feel free to use your Dutch oven in stead.
 

Heat 1 or 2 tbsp oil in a skillet and cook the chicken until it loses its rawness. Transfer the chicken to the tagine.
Chicken & Onion Tagine

Heat a little extra oil and sauté the onion slices until slightly translucent.
Chicken & Onion Tagine

Pour the warm chicken broth into the tagine. Never add cold liquids to a warm tagine or warm liquids to a cold tagine!
Chicken & Onion Tagine

As soon as the onions are nearly done, add the garlic and sprinkle the other 2/3 tbsp curry powder, cinnamon and cayenne pepper all over. Cook for an extra 30 seconds.
Chicken & Onion Tagine

 
I use a lot of curry powder in my dishes. Addicted to the stuff. Feel free to tone it down a little.
 

Top the chicken with the fragrant onions, add the raisins and, depending on the saltness of your stock, add a pinch of sea salt.
Chicken & Onion Tagine

 
Put the lid on and let it simmer for 20 minutes.
 

After 20 minutes it’s time to gently stir the onions allowing the liquid to naturally thicken up some.
Chicken & Onion Tagine

At this point I decided I also wanted some of the liquid to evaporate during cooking, so I simply stuck a fork between the top and bottom lid allowing some steam to escape.
Chicken & Onion Tagine

Simmer for another 15 minutes. This was perfect for us—I just needed the sauce to moisten and flavor the rice I was serving it with.
Chicken & Onion Tagine

 
If you’re looking for a thicker sauce, let it cook down without the lid or add some corn starch.
 

This was such a simple, tasty and extremely aromatic chicken tagine.
Chicken & Onion Tagine

Chicken & Onion Tagine
Ingredients
    1 1/2 pound chicken fillet
    3 medium to large onions (1 pound)
    2/3 tbsp curry powder
    1/8 tsp cayenne
    1/4 to 1/2 tsp black pepper
    1/4 tsp cinnamon (slightly heaping)
    1 garlic clove
    1 tbsp flour
    1/2 tsp salt + a pinch extra
    1/4 cup raisins
    2/3 tbsp curry powder
    2 to 3 tbsp sunflower oil
    2/3 cup chicken stock

Directions
    Mix the 1st 2/3 tbsp curry powder with the flour, black pepper and salt. Cut each chicken breast into 3 or 4 large pieces and sprinkle the seasoning all over. Cut the onions in thick slices and grate the garlic. Slowly heat the tagine on a flame divider or use your Dutch oven.

    Heat 1 or 2 tbsp oil in a skillet and cook the chicken until it loses its rawness. Transfer the chicken to the tagine. Heat a little extra oil and sauté the onion slices until slightly translucent.

    Pour the warm chicken broth into the tagine. Never add cold liquids to a warm tagine or warm liquids to a cold tagine!

    As soon as the onions are nearly done, add the garlic and sprinkle the other 2/3 tbsp curry powder, cinnamon and cayenne pepper all over. Cook for an extra 30 seconds.

    Top the chicken with the fragrant onions, add the raisins and, depending on the saltness of your stock, add a pinch of sea salt. Put the lid on and cook for 20 minutes. Then gently you stir the onions into the liquid, put a fork between the top and bottom layer of the tagine and give it another 15 minutes.

    Simmer for another 15 minutes. If you’re looking for a thicker sauce, let it cook down without the lid or add some corn starch.
Meal type: tagine, main course, chicken
Servings: 4
Copyright: © kayotickitchen.com

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    25 Comments »

    1. 1

      Key, stop it! I can’t possibly cook all these delicious things at the speed you’re posting them! :)

      I need to get me a kitchen scale like this… 

      Igal Tabachnik on Sep 8, 2011 @ 11:06 am Reply
      1. Had it for a while now and really like it. Measures liquid and weight, so no need to use cups when baking, you can just switch to liquid and pour it in.

        Kay on Sep 8, 2011 @ 12:14 pm Reply
    2. 2

      I’m loving your tagine recipes, please don’t stop! This recipe is one of the best you’ve ever made in my opinion. I’m from the Middle East and some of my very favourite foods include raisins in savoury dishes. There’s a wonderful rice dish called “Roz B Khalta” or rice with raisins and nuts that’s an integral part of any big dinner party or wedding buffet. You’ve totally inspired me to make it as a side dish to your delicious tagine chicken:)

      Nevine @ Tableya on Sep 8, 2011 @ 1:43 pm Reply
    3. 3

      I’m obsessed…literally obsessed with your cooking recipes!  I’ve tried two of them and I’m ecstatic that they came out so well.  I’m a beginner at the cooking thang since I just got married, but I love your taste! I’m definitely gonna have to buy a tagine.  I saw a very pretty one a williams sonoma the other day!  Thanks for the recipes!  Keep them coming :)

      Teri on Sep 8, 2011 @ 4:18 pm Reply
      1. Hope you’ll love it as much as I do.

        Make sure to buy a flame divider as well if you want to use it on your stovetop (and if it doesn’t have a cast iron bottom).

        Kay on Sep 8, 2011 @ 4:23 pm Reply
    4. 4

      Oh, 2/3 Tbs=2 tsp. Just saying. This recipe looks sooooo good. I’ve got to try it when I have some chicken to cook. I don’t have a tagine-your recipes make me want one for sure. Can I use a crock pot? Or soup pot that can go into the oven?

      Jodi on Sep 8, 2011 @ 8:22 pm Reply
    5. 5

      That looks brilliant. I’ve been wanting to buy a tajine for a while now but I’m having a closetspace issue at the moment..:) Bookmarked the recipe!

      Simone on Sep 9, 2011 @ 6:41 am Reply
    6. 6

      Dat ziet er weer heerlijk uit, waar haal jij je inspiratie vandaan?

      Femke on Sep 9, 2011 @ 9:31 am Reply
      1. Uit 15 jaar dag in dag uit koken?

        Kay on Sep 9, 2011 @ 9:40 am Reply
    7. 7

      I echo that first comment. You’re constantly posting things I want to make so badly–but don’t stop! Keep it up. I’ll get to them eventually. =)

      Jenna on Sep 9, 2011 @ 5:09 pm Reply
    8. 8

      Is a flame divider the same as a flame tamer? I have the latter, but my online search for the former was not productive. I use the flame tamer fairly often. Thanks. This does look like something I need to make soon, tagine or not.

      PJCarz on Sep 9, 2011 @ 7:00 pm Reply
      1. Not sure how exactly this is called in English, it’s what we use to place a pan atop when we want to let something simmer very slowly for a long time.

        Kay on Sep 9, 2011 @ 7:25 pm Reply
    9. 9

      My friend could not view a printable version of this recipe, so I sent it to her by e-mail. That was no help because the e-mail didn’t show a printable version but merely referred her back to this post. :(

      SMCI on Sep 10, 2011 @ 8:18 pm Reply
      1. Maybe you could just copy and paste the printable recipe in an email and send it to her? 

        Kay on Sep 10, 2011 @ 9:17 pm Reply
    10. 10

      Oh wow, that dish looks incredible!  Okay, my search is on for an affordable tangine!  Any tips on purchasing one?

      Rachel on Sep 11, 2011 @ 6:09 am Reply
    11. 11

      Thanks, Kay. Flame tamer and divider are indeed the same thing.

      PJCarz on Sep 13, 2011 @ 10:08 pm Reply
    12. 12

      I’m a Dutchie, living in Portugal and married to a Canadian and I just wanted to say I absolutely LOVE your site! The delicious recipes, the beautiful pictures, the international character.. Great great great site! Keep it going! :)

      Sarah on Sep 15, 2011 @ 7:20 pm Reply
    13. 13

      For an affordable place to purchase a Tagine, I suggest Zamouri Spices.
      http://www.zamourispices.com/
       
      They have a nice selection, different styles, and sizes. I bought the plainest, unglazed model, and have loved it.

      Eggy on Sep 16, 2011 @ 4:23 am Reply
    14. 14

      Would these recipes be much different if tey were cooked in a frying pan and not cooked in a Tagine?

      Sheila Dingwell on Oct 14, 2011 @ 7:35 pm Reply
    15. 15

      I’ve been desperate to make this since you posted it and only now have my dutch oven so I’m all over it.  Only thing – I live in Small Town, Kansas USA and they don’t have sunflower oil at my store.  Will it ruin the dish if I use another type of oil?  What type do you suggest?  
      Thanks Kay – I really enjoy your blog.   

      Ginni on Dec 23, 2011 @ 4:36 pm Reply
      1. Lord no, what I wouldn’t use is olive oil, but any type of cooking oil that doesn’t have an intrusive flavor should work. You can also do this with butter, even gives a little extra richness to it.

        Kay on Dec 23, 2011 @ 4:50 pm Reply
    16. 16

      I’ve tried so many curried chicken recipes in my tagine and have been disappointed with every one. Until this time! I’ve finally found someone who loves the taste of curry as much as I do :) I’ll definitely make this again, and I look forward to exploring your blog.

      Toni on May 22, 2012 @ 3:46 am Reply
    17. 17

      I have a tagine that I was planning to use for a different chicken curry recipe this weekend.  This will be the first time I have used it.  I have a gas stove.  Do I need a flame tamer over a gas cooktop or electric cooktop or both?  I did not know that one was required to use the tagine on the cooktop.  I actually planned to bake it in the oven.  Thank you for the wonderful recipe ideas.

      Connie on Oct 3, 2012 @ 6:12 pm Reply
    18. 18

      I love this recipe and the step by step instructions with photos. However, could you allow for a printable version off your site? I had to either print 10 pages for the recipe and instructions or cut and paste it into a word document myself.

      Patricia on Apr 4, 2015 @ 11:38 pm Reply
    19. 19

      I just got this out of the oven. I haven’t been cooking the last couple of years much, due to changes in personal circumstances… but this got me right back in the mood!!! I tweaked it a little, Kay, I’m sure you don’t mind… a bit of ginger and lemon zest as I am a fan of both.. wonderfully fragrant and soon to be gobbled up!!!

      Peter Papageorgiou on Dec 25, 2015 @ 1:58 pm Reply

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