Aug 25, 2014

Salsa di Pomodoro

Salsa di Pomodoro

Tomato sauce, in plain English. I bought an old-school food mill. Passe-vite, if you will, or passeerzeef for those in the Netherlands. Whatever name you want to give it, I’m so happy with the darn thing. It improved the quality of my tomato sauces by, oh well, something like 200%.

Time saver, since you don’t have to remove skin or seeds anymore, you can let the mill do that for you. Makes a mean fluffy, creamy mashed potato as well, but we’ll save that for another blog post.

Especially this tomato sauce—inspired by the amazing Alton Brown—is like crack. In fact, it’s so good I should’ve named it crack sauce.

Can’t call it a basic sauce, because really; can you call a sauce made from slow roasted plum tomatoes drizzled with olive oil, buttery roasted garlic, sweet and soft onion and a boatload of herbs reduced with butter and white wine basic? I think not.

Flavour explosion. No other phrase for it. Use a lazy Sunday to make this fantastic sauce and, aside from impressing your dinner guests, I assure you that you’ll never buy another jar of tomato sauce again.

 

Ingredients:

3 pound plum tomatoes (Roma)
1 medium-sized onion
4 garlic cloves
1 1/2 tsp dried oregano
1 1/2 tsp dried thyme
1 tsp dried basil
1 tsp kosher salt
1/2 to 1 tsp ground black pepper
1 oz/25 gr butter
4 tbsp olive oil
6,5 tbsp/100ml dry white wine

 

Directions:

Got my hands on some gorgeous Roma tomatoes. Wash them well.
Salsa di Pomodoro

Cut them in half length-wise and arrange them, cut side up, on a baking tray.
Salsa di Pomodoro

Don’t peel the garlic. They’ll roast inside their skin and get all mellow and buttery. It’s delicious.
Salsa di Pomodoro

Randomly throw them in with the tomatoes.
Salsa di Pomodoro

Finely chop the onion and scatter it over the tomatoes.
Salsa di Pomodoro

Evenly distribute the olive oil.
Salsa di Pomodoro

I like a little kick to my sauces, so I replaced 1 tbsp oil with red chili oil.
Salsa di Pomodoro

Sprinkle the dried spices, salt and pepper over the tomatoes. I like my sauces heavy on spices, so feel free to tone it down.
Salsa di Pomodoro

 
Place the roasting tray in a preheated oven at 160Cº (320Fº) for 2 hours. Keep an eye on them and if, after an hour or so, it looks as though they’re cooking too fast, lower the heat. We’re slowly roasting the tomatoes and onions to bring out their natural sweetness, but we don’t want to burn them.
 

Poor sucker was all alone. Didn’t fit it into the roasting tray anymore, so I ate it. Someone had to do it.
Salsa di Pomodoro

Here’s said food mill. Mine comes with three discs. I set it up using the medium disc. You just place it over your pan and crank the handle.
Salsa di Pomodoro

Here’s what my tomatoes looked like after 2 hours. The scent that arose was just heavenly.
Salsa di Pomodoro

I ran them through the food mill (medium disc). The skin, the garlic skin, most of the seeds and the bigger pieces of herbs stayed behind.
Salsa di Pomodoro

Leaving me with this delicious sauce. Still some seeds in there, but we’ll deal with that later. Taste the sauce, if the tomatoes were very acidic, you could always add a sprinkling of sugar as well.
Salsa di Pomodoro

Add the butter and the white wine. You can also add less white wine or use some plain water or broth in stead. Your call.
Salsa di Pomodoro

 
Bring the sauce to a boil and let it simmer over low heat for about 15 to 20 minutes. No lid. Never use a lid when cooking tomato sauce! This is mainly to reduce it to a thicker sauce that will really stick to your pasta. And ribs.
 

Gave me time to rinse off the food mill and set it up with the small hole disc.
Salsa di Pomodoro

After the sauce has cooked down, you check the seasoning because it might need an extra pinch of salt. Then I ran it through the food mill again, getting rid of the last seeds, chunkier pieces of herbs, onion and garlic.
Salsa di Pomodoro

Leaving me with a smooth and silky tomato sauce that still had a bit of structure. Man, I love that darn food mill.
Salsa di Pomodoro

The finishing touch; a splash of my new favourite basil oil.
Salsa di Pomodoro

I really do love this photo. Had to squeeze it in here.
Salsa di Pomodoro

This sauce is so very good. So rich in flavour.
Salsa di Pomodoro

Salsa di Pomodoro
Ingredients
    3 pound plum tomatoes (Roma)
    1 medium-sized onion
    4 garlic cloves
    1 1/2 tsp dried oregano
    1 1/2 tsp dried thyme
    1 tsp dried basil
    1 tsp kosher salt
    1/2 to 1 tsp ground black pepper
    1 oz/25 gr butter
    4 tbsp olive oil
    6,5 tbsp/100ml dry white wine

Directions
    Wash the tomatoes. Cut them in half length-wise and arrange them, cut side up, on a baking tray. Place the garlic cloves, inside their skin, in with the tomatoes. Finely cut the onion and sprinkle it over the tomatoes. Pour the oil all over and sprinkle the salt, pepper and herbs over the tomatoes. Place the roasting tray in a preheated oven at 160Cº (320Fº) for 2 hours. Keep an eye on them, and if after an hour it looks as though they’re cooking too fast, lower the heat.

    After they’re done you run them throuygh a food mill with a medium fine disc. Might still be some seeds in there, but that’s okay. Taste the sauce, if the tomatoes were very acidic, you could always add a sprinkling of sugar as well. Add the butter and the white wine. You can also add less white wine or use some plain water or broth in stead. Bring the sauce to a boil and let it simmer over low heat for about 15 to 20 minutes. No lid.

    Rinse your food mill and set it up with the fine hole plate. After the sauce has cooked down, check the seasoning because it might need an extra pinch of salt. Run the sauce through the food mill (fine hole plate) again.

    My finishing touch is a splash of good-quality basil oil.

Meal type: Italian, Sauces, vegetarian
Servings: 2 to 3 cups sauce
Copyright: © kayotickitchen.com
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