Nov 15, 2011

Austrian Goulash Soup

Austrian Goulash Soup

I found this recipe in one of my grandma’s cook books. You see, our Dutch food is the pretty straight-forward, no-nonsense and nourishing type of food. No light summer dishes or use of exotic spices.

I love our Dutch food, but there’s a time and place for everything, so when autumn sets in that’s when I install myself on the couch with a huge pile of Dutch cook books and a cup of tea and try to find some new ideas to go into my meal rotation. I’m a compulsive meal planner.

I just didn’t expect an Austrian recipe in there. Not sure why: I vaguely remembered how she loved Austria and vacationed there at least once a year. But somehow this recipe managed to go unnoticed.

Such a shame because having made it for the first time I can assure you: this is an amazing soup. Almost in a stew kind of way. Huge chunks of beef and potato in a fragrant bouillon.

What’s not to love?

 
Ingredients:

1 pound stewing beef
1 beef shin (or a soup bone)
1 pound potatoes
2 garlic cloves
1 red bell pepper
2 large onions
1 small can tomato paste
1 can diced tomatoes (14oz)
1/2 to 1 tsp chili flakes
1 tsp oregano (or marjoram)
1/2 tsp caraway seeds
1 tsp dried thyme
2 tbsp sweet paprika powder
2 beef bouillon cubes
2 tsp white vinegar
6 cups of water
2 bay leaves
salt & pepper

 

Directions:

Cube the beef. I also use a beef shin. You can replace it with a soup bone. I never make soup without some sort of soup bone.
Austrian Goulash Soup

Mince the onions, bell pepper and peel and cube the potatoes. Grate the garlic.
Austrian Goulash Soup

Heat a few drops of oil and lightly sauté the onions and pepper. Nothing major, just a minute or 2. Add the garlic and give it another minute.
Austrian Goulash Soup

Stir in the tomato paste and give it some time to sweeten up.
Austrian Goulash Soup

In with the caraway seeds, thyme, dried chili flakes and sweet paprika powder.
Austrian Goulash Soup

 
I used the sweet Hungarian paprika powder for this. It’s also available in a hot powdered version. Just look for sweet paprika powder, not the regular kind.
 

The original recipe called for marjoram and I didn’t have any. I replaced it with oregano. It worked. End of story.
Austrian Goulash Soup

Check out the water shot! Add the water and bouillon cubes.
Austrian Goulash Soup

 
tip: health-food stores always carry a large selection of MSG-free bouillon cubes. At least here they do.
 

Add the meat. And again, the bone/marrow adds so much flavor and richness to the soup.
Austrian Goulash Soup

Add a pinch of black pepper, the vinegar and stir in the potatoes.
Austrian Goulash Soup

 
I added my potatoes at the start so that they’d slowly cook slightly apart and thicken the soup. You can also add them later.
 

In with the can of diced tomatoes.
Austrian Goulash Soup

And the bay leaves, bring the soup to a boil and simmer it over low heat for 2 and a half hours.
Austrian Goulash Soup

It smelled SO fabulous.
Austrian Goulash Soup

Remove the beef shin and bone, pick the meat apart and put it back in with the soup.
Austrian Goulash Soup

 
Discard the bay leaves and season the soup with salt and pepper to taste. Garnish the soup with parsley and a scoop of sour cream, if you like.
 

Serve this stick-to-your ribs kind of soup with lots of crusty bread.
Austrian Goulash Soup

 
Special Recipe Card

Click here for printable size.

Austrian Goulash Soup
Ingredients
    1 pound stewing beef
    1 beef shin (or a soup bone)
    1 pound potatoes
    2 garlic cloves
    1 red bell pepper
    2 large onions
    1 small can tomato paste
    1 can diced tomatoes (14oz)
    1/2 to 1 tsp chili flakes
    1 tsp oregano (or marjoram)
    1/2 tsp caraway seeds
    1 tsp dried thyme
    2 tbsp sweet paprika powder
    2 beef bouillon cubes
    2 tsp white vinegar
    6 cups of water
    2 bay leaves
    salt & pepper

    Optionally: nutmeg

Directions
    Mince the onions, bell pepper and peel and cube the potatoes. Grate the garlic. Heat a few drops of oil and lightly sauté the onions and pepper for a minute or 2. Add the garlic and give it another minute. Stir in the tomato paste and cook for a minute.

    Add the caraway seeds, thyme, chili flakes, sweet paprika powder, marjoram or oregano. Pour in the water and add the bouillon cubes. Add your meat along with a pinch of pepper, the vinegar, diced tomatoes and potatoes.

    And the bay leaves, bring the soup to a boil and simmer it over low heat for 2 and a half hours. Remove the beef shin and bone, pick the meat apart and put it back in with the soup.

    Discard the bay leaves and season the soup with salt and pepper to taste.

Meal type: dinner, lunch, soups
Servings: 4
Copyright: © kayotickitchen.com

    © kayotic.com
    Click here to print recipes older than 2010
    e-mail this post to a friend


    44 Comments »

    1. 1

      I love those cards – they are so adorable. Gonna print them all :)
      And thanks for recipe – i believe my bf will love it. Also i cook smth simmilar to this one, just i use pork or chicken more often, bcz they are done in shorter time :) 

      Indrė on Nov 15, 2011 @ 10:24 am Reply
      1. This is really a lazy Sunday soup, that’s for sure. Wondering how it will taste with chicken now. Might have to try that!

        Kay on Nov 15, 2011 @ 10:25 am Reply
    2. 2

      With chicken it’s done in like maximum 40minutes, so I cook it after work for dinner. And next day I add some canned beans, reheat and it’s also very very good :)

      Indrė on Nov 15, 2011 @ 10:33 am Reply
    3. 3

      This one’s going on my “make soon!” list right now!

      Maria on Nov 15, 2011 @ 11:16 am Reply
    4. 4

      this. makes. me. cry.

      Bev Weidner on Nov 15, 2011 @ 1:54 pm Reply
      1. Don’t cry, Bev… you can have a bite :)

        Kay on Nov 15, 2011 @ 1:55 pm Reply
    5. 5

      This sounds so delicious, Kay! It’s very similar to the beef stew that I make often except for the vinegar and caraway seeds. I’m going to try adding those next time!

      Lana @ Never Enough Thyme on Nov 15, 2011 @ 3:16 pm Reply
    6. 6

      It does look like the perfect autumn soup. Go Austrians! And yeah, what’s not to love?

      Amy on Nov 15, 2011 @ 4:53 pm Reply
    7. 7

      This looks so comforting and perfect! I’m thinking this weekend I could use a bowl of this very stuff . . .

      Jenna on Nov 15, 2011 @ 5:35 pm Reply
    8. 8

      I’ve been looking for a new recipe to make the house smell good on Sundays!  How do you think this recipe would fare in the crockpot?

      Tiffany on Nov 15, 2011 @ 5:45 pm Reply
      1. My guess is it would work perfectly. I do believe that that crockpot recipes need less liquid, though, so you might want to alter the amount of liquid to make it more crockpot suitable.

        Kay on Nov 15, 2011 @ 6:08 pm Reply
    9. 9

      I believe this dish is Hungarian – but as there used to be a Austria-Hungarian empire once I can see where the confusion started :)

      I LOVE this dish, I usually make a big pot to keep everybody happy for a few days :)

      I cook it in the oven but originally it is cooked on a bonfire in a huge malm pot. 

      Liina on Nov 15, 2011 @ 8:38 pm Reply
      1. Actually, it’s not… but from what I’ve been told and remember from my school days there is a lot of cross-pollination in food between Hungary and Austria. 

        Guessing they both fought over who gets to take credit for this dish :)

        Goulash itself is more a Hungarian thing and turning it into a soup an Austrian thing.

        Kay on Nov 15, 2011 @ 8:44 pm Reply
        1. I, myself Austrian, would too rather call it “hungarian”. But nevermind. In general, there’s a lot of confusion about the origins of “austrian” food anyways – our cuisine is very similar not only to the Hungarian but also to Czech and Slowanian one ;)

          Kate on Nov 15, 2011 @ 10:03 pm Reply
          1. No matter how I google it, in German, Dutch or English.. I keep coming up with the same thing, that this is a typically Austrian dish. Gulass zuppe is Austrian, and Gulyas stew is Hungarian.

            You’re one of the few, if not the only Austrian, who calls the soup Hungarian. Must admit that a soup version doesn’t strike me as Hungarian either. 

            Now I want to know for sure :) 

            Kay on Nov 15, 2011 @ 10:43 pm
      2. i just read the recipe and I was sure somebody would say that. I am Austrian and yes, originally the Goulash was Hungarian, however, us Austrians made our own version which is a bit thicker, a bit less spicy and we call is Gulasch. There are also other versions in other countries. The Dutch make a Goulash which is even a lot less spicy but has more veggies.

        Aline on Nov 19, 2011 @ 5:27 am Reply
        1. That’s what I thought made this one so much different from the Hungarian Goulash I’ve had! This is much thicker. Hungarian Goulash is quite runny, at least the ones I’ve had, but this was really thick and stew-like. 

          We add an awful lot of veggies to almost everything. Pasta sauces, for instance, always contain lots of fresh vegetables here.

          Having tasted this I’m tempted to believe that this really is an Austrian dish with a Hungarian influence, but they definitely made it their own.

          Kay on Nov 19, 2011 @ 10:27 am Reply
    10. 10

      I love every part of this soup, who cares if it’s Austrian or Hungarian as long as it’s warm, comforting and tasty!

      Rhonda on Nov 16, 2011 @ 1:41 am Reply
    11. 11

      Looks splendid! Do tell-what is that tool used for mincing the garlic? I must find one!!
      Thank you

      eko on Nov 16, 2011 @ 3:57 am Reply
      1. It’s called a Leifheit garlic king!

        Kay on Nov 16, 2011 @ 10:55 am Reply
    12. 12

      I am Hungarian and i actually live here in Hungary – there is no such thing as a Gulyas stew here just soup – even more liquidy than the one you made, and we do not use california peppers or tomatoes just the grained Hungarian sweet paprika. So is guess you can call this dish a Austrian gulyas soup :) even though i believe there is no such thing… looks delicious by the way! 

      Kata on Nov 16, 2011 @ 6:47 am Reply
    13. 13

      oh search gulyásleves for pictures – you wont understand a word but you can see the pictures :)

      Kata on Nov 16, 2011 @ 6:49 am Reply
    14. 14

      I got a similar recipe of goulash on my site and the info that I found about goulash is this: This thick, hearty dish was (and still is) a very popular dish among herdsmen in Hungary. This peasant dish got on the table only towards the end of the 19th century. Restaurants started to put goulash on their menus to. By the second half of the 20th century the soup became the number one dish of Hungary. It got this name because the herdsman of Hungary often traveled far from home on horseback with their sheep to find better pastures on the Hungarian plains. At nightfall the herdsman’s would build a fire, slaughter an animal and then cook it for several hours in a large pot hanging over the fire known as a bográc.
      There are many different ways of making goulash, as it is with every dish. Goulash can be served with potatoes, dumplings, spatzle, or just as a stand-alone dish with bread.
      As usual lovely pics Kay ;)

      Arrisje on Nov 16, 2011 @ 1:59 pm Reply
    15. 15

      Funny, I had dinner with a Dutch friend recently who served goulash–she said it was her grandmother’s old recipe, but had no idea how someone born and raised in the Netherlands way back when got hold of a goulash recipe. I wonder if there’s a historical reason for this (and YOUR grandmother’s recipe). Anyhow, this sounds like a delightful winter meal!

      Felicia on Nov 17, 2011 @ 7:57 pm Reply
    16. 16

      I am cooking this right now and It smells like heaven.

      Cheryl rhemann on Feb 6, 2012 @ 8:09 am Reply
    17. 17

      This is was amazing! I love your site! Thank you!

      Melanie on Feb 10, 2012 @ 6:44 pm Reply
    18. 18

      i had this soup while skiing in austria a few years back, im cooking this using the above recipe as i write this, hope the taste will take me back to the slopes!

      daniel b on Feb 17, 2012 @ 9:59 pm Reply
    19. 19

      Great! Looks delicious.

      heimpflege on Feb 28, 2012 @ 6:15 am Reply
    20. 20

      Adding some cream instead of canned tomatoes makes a very good alternative dish

      Jaana on Mar 29, 2012 @ 7:05 pm Reply
    21. 21

      Made this soup today and it was oh so good. I did make a few changes which were leaving out caraway seeds (i am not a fan of them) I also used almost 2lbs beef stew and 1 big soup bone and increased water to 8 cups. We added small noodles to our bowls when it was done and had some crusty bread with butter. My kids loved it which is a switch :) Thanks for the great recipe.

      Yvette on Jul 25, 2012 @ 10:39 pm Reply
    22. 22

      I was looking at the site and the recipes are amazing. And my english is pretty well but from some ingredients i cannot tell what they are in dutch, like caraway seeds as they could be karwij of komijn zaadjes. Could u perhaps write here or in ur blog some translation of the ingredients? Thank you very much and keep up the good job !!
       

      Mariska on Oct 5, 2012 @ 4:59 pm Reply
      1. Caraway is karwij en cumin is komijn, Mariska.

        Kay on Oct 5, 2012 @ 5:22 pm Reply
    23. 23

      Mijn dank is groot , ga dit binnenkort eens maken. Het weer is er naar en het allom bekende stoofvlees en hachee ken ik wel maar dit is weer eens iets anders :)

      Mariska on Oct 5, 2012 @ 5:38 pm Reply
    24. 24

      No red wine!??! :) I am shocked! Then again… I put rw into pretty much EVERYTHING that contains beef…

      Iana on Nov 26, 2012 @ 4:44 pm Reply
    25. 25

      I don’t’ care if its Hungarian, Austrian or Australian this is amazing every time and I have made it year round. It is one of my all time favorite recipes since I discovered it  on Pinterest.
      Since then I have also tried and LOVE the Bombay potatoes and stuffed zucchini! SO delicious! Thanks for your blog, this is now my go to site when I am looking for something new to try!

      Melissa on Aug 6, 2013 @ 2:40 am Reply

    RSS feed for comments on this post.

    Leave a comment