Sep 23, 2013

Seroendeng

Seroendeng

Even though I grew up with big bowls of seroendeng on our dinner table, I can’t remember my mom ever making this wonderfully seasoned Indonesian coconut & peanut mix herself. Same goes for me. And why? I have no idea. It’s dead-simple. Especially this straightforward version.

Now that I made it myself I can tell you that I will never want to eat store-bought seroendeng again. This tastes a thousand, heck, even a million times better than the jars filled with bland, overly chewy and second-rate peanuts you can buy in our supermarkets and toko’s.

Normally I sprinkle this all over my Indonesian food—especially chicken satay or anything with peanut sauce—as sort of a finishing touch, but this I could eat by the spoonful.

 

Ingredients:

1 stalk lemon grass
4.5oz/125gr coconut flakes
4 tbsp brown sugar
1/2 tbsp ground ginger (djahe)
1 1/2 tsp ground coriander (ketoembar)
2 kaffir lime leaves (djeruk purut)
1 garlic clove
1 tsp kosher salt
3.5oz/100 gr unsalted peanuts (with skin)
2 tbsp sunflower oil

 
Directions:

Start by smashing your lemon grass, tie a knot in it and then smash the knot a few extra times: it will release more flavour this way.
Seroendeng

Place it on a baking tray that you lined with a silpat or parchment paper.
Seroendeng

Mix the coconut flakes with the brown sugar, ginger, coriander and salt.
Seroendeng

Mix it with your hands because that way you can get rid of little sugar clumps.
Seroendeng

Add the coconut mix to the baking tray.
Seroendeng

Push the kaffir lime leaves in there as well.
Seroendeng

 
Give the coconut flakes 20 minutes in a preheated oven at 175Cº (350Fº), but stir it every 5 minutes or so. Not only will it brown more evenly, but the lemon grass and lime leaf flavour will be distributed as well.
 

On to the peanuts.
Seroendeng

You can add them whole, but I like to break them up a bit. Don’t smash the heck out of them, though.
Seroendeng

Heat the oil and cook the peanuts until you start to see a tan. This will take virtually no time: few minutes tops.
Seroendeng

Squeeze in the garlic and cook for another minute. Let the peanuts drain on paper towels.
Seroendeng

The coconut mix should be nice and brown by now. Discard the lemon grass and kaffir lime leaves.
Seroendeng

Mix the peanuts with the coconut. That’s it, folks! No more magic to it than this.
Seroendeng

 
Store the seroendeng in a dark place in an airtight jar! You can also store it in the freezer, but I never do.
 

Sprinkle generously over rice and other dishes.
Seroendeng

 

Seroendeng
Ingredients
    1 stalk lemon grass
    4.5oz/125gr coconut flakes
    4 tbsp brown sugar
    1/2 tbsp ground ginger (djahe)
    1 1/2 tsp ground coriander (ketoembar)
    2 kaffir lime leaves (djeruk purut)
    1 garlic clove
    1 tsp kosher salt
    3.5oz/100 gr unsalted peanuts (with skin)
    2 tbsp sunflower oil

Directions
    Start by smashing your lemon grass, tie a knot in it and then smash the knot a few extra times: it will release more flavour this way. Place it on a baking tray that you lined with a silpat or parchment paper. Mix the coconut flakes with the brown sugar, ginger, coriander and salt and add it to the baking tray. Push the kaffir lime leaves in there as well. Give the coconut flakes 20 minutes in a preheated oven at 175Cº (350Fº), but stir it every 5 minutes or so. Not only will it brown more evenly, but the lemon grass and lime leaf flavour will be distributed as well.

    Add the peanuts whole or break them up a bit first. Heat the oil and cook the peanuts until you start to see a tan. This will take virtually no time: few minutes tops. Squeeze in the garlic and cook for another minute. Let the peanuts drain on paper towels. Once the coconut mix is all brown, discard the leaves and lemon grass and mix it with the peanuts.

    Store the seroendeng in a dark place in an airtight jar or in your freezer.

Meal type: Sauces and Condiments, Indonesian
Servings: 1
Copyright: © kayotickitchen.com
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